Running up, over and through the cogs

Humble Pie on the Fly: The 2013 Chicago Marathon Race Report

No matter how bad I feel a run or race went, there is always a part of running where I am smiling from ear to ear. If running can keep me smiling like that, it will always be a part of my life.

Ali Tremaine

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Running through Chinatown during the 2013 Chicago Marathon.

I put a lot of pressure on myself to make 2013 the year I accomplished my ultimate marathon goal of running under three hours. In doing so I developed chronic Achilles tendonitis and spent a lot of time on the bike, neither of which got me any closer to my goal.

In the three weeks leading up to the Chicago Marathon, it became very clear that sub-3 was not going to happen on October 13. I made peace with that, and hung on to the hope that I could fight my way to a 3:10 finish.

The running gods, in all their ironic glory, would have a little something to say about that.

Sunday, October 13, 2013
4:30 a.m.

It’s race morning and I’ve been up since I went to bed. Did I ever sleep? Not really. And all this tossing and turning through the night has left me achy, nervous and cranky. I better eat.

A banana, a bagel and a half a cup of coffee later, and I feel much better. Being up on my feet and totally awake now has slowed the constant loop of worry that was going through my head: Will my heels hold up? Am I fit enough for the distance? Have I set myself up for failure?

Now it’s just a matter of going through my regular routine and getting to the start line.

6:00 a.m.

It’s a tad chilly, but perfect for running. I suspect the temperature is hovering around 50 degrees, and though I’m wearing sweats while I wait for the corrals to open, I have to keep moving to keep warm.

I got here early, in anticipation of large crowds and heightened security, and now all I can do it is wait. And think.

My game plan for today is to start with the 3:10 pace team and just stick with them through 20 miles, then see what happens. Over the last several days, I have convinced myself I can indeed run a 3:10 marathon despite not having done any speed work since mid-September. I have convinced myself that my long hours in the gym and muscle memory from races past will be enough to propel me towards the finish line at 7 minutes, 15 seconds per mile.

I mean, c’mon, it’s 7:15 pace. That’s easy.

Oh Mr. Confidence, sometimes you can be a sly, deceiving little punk.

7:00 a.m.

I’ve hit the head four times now, so surely there’s nothing left. I make my way to A Corral and slip myself into the warm-up loop circling with svelte, uber fast specimens. After a couple of revolutions, I see John Kiser and immediately say hello.

My newly coiffed mohawk must be throwing him because he squints and tilts his head to the side questioningly.

“Hi, John, it’s me, Jeff.” I say.

“Yes! Hi! How are ya?”

“Well…”

We both give each other the look. The look is: I don’t really know but we’re gonna find out soon.

A few days ago, I emailed John, a friend I met through the New Leaf and M.U.D.D. groups, to see if he would be leading the 3:10 Nike Pace team as he has done in years past. He assured me he was, but that he had been dealing with some aggravating tendonitis in his knee that may limit his abilities. Of course, I told him about my Achilles tendonitis, and we bonded as only extremely competitive, marathon maniacs on the mend are wont to do.

Now, here we are, just a few minutes from the start, exchanging the look with nervous undertones disguised as light conversation.

“Did you see the Bradley/Marquez fight last night?” I asked.

“Nah, did you see the Michigan/Penn State game?”

We carry conversation to quell the anticipation.

Joined by John are two other pacers, Dale and Brian — both skinny and fast, looking the part. I remind myself to just tuck in with these guys and hold on. Whatever happens, happens.

The elites are introduced, the Star Spangled Banner is sung, a fly over misses its mark and then…

WE’RE OFF!

Miles 1-7.5

Um… why is it so quiet? I think to myself.

Ordinarily, the beginning of the Chicago Marathon is a raucous roar of people down Columbus Drive. But due to the increased security measures brought on by two lunatics earlier this year, no spectators have been allowed at this traditionally jam-packed part of the course. And it sucks.

As my legs move underneath my feet and the pace set by our leaders begins to set in, the eery quiet makes me think: Oh boy, we got a looooong way to go. And this might be too much.

Doubt. I knew it would pop up eventually. It usually does and I’m usually ready for it. But I didn’t expect it to pop up before we reach the first mile marker.

When I began marathoning, a wise runner told me to “always respect the distance.” Running 26.2 miles is never easy. The distance makes sure of that. So running it at a particular, fast pace is never easy either. To think that I’ve reached a level where I can just go through the motions to accomplish what I consider a relatively speedy finish is as dangerous as it is foolish.

Respect the distance, or it will beat your ass.

Pretty sure today is gonna be one of those ass beatin’ days, regardless.

After the symphony of Garmin beeps signals the first mile, I look down to see I never even started my watch. Oh, nice move, Jeff.

All the more reason to stick with John, Dale and Brian.

Our group is probably 15-20 people but I can’t tell for sure because we are all spread out, still trying to get through the early maze of runners bunched.

As we approach Lincoln Park around mile 5, I realize I haven’t looked up from the ground hardly at all. I am so intent on staying with the pace group that the only way I feel comfortable is by not paying attention to everything around me. In some ways, this is a shame, because the Chicago Marathon is one of the most supported races I’ve ever run, with exuberant crowds lining the streets. It’s also a fantastic tour of the city I love so much. But today I am giving up aesthetics for performance, and right now all I can do to hang on is watch the feet in front of me.

Surprisingly, I feel pretty good.

In fact, 7.5 miles in and I’m still feeling pretty good. Except… I have to pee.

Miles 7.5-13

It must be nerves still because I’ve never peed so many times just before a race. Plus, other than a half cup of coffee, I haven’t had anything to drink since 7 p.m. last night!

Too bad, bladder. I’m not stopping.

I can’t believe I’m holding pace as well as I am right now. If I stop to pee I’ll never catch up.

As we zip through Boystown and the rest of Lakeview, our even split pace and building camaraderie in the 3:10 group is enough to silence my bladder. As long as I concentrate on staying with the pacers, I am able to forget about what ails me. Watching Dale’s feet — one step in front of the other, over and over and over again — has hypnotized me into a time trance. I’m totally focused on breathing and breathing alone.

The miles go by. The crowds continue to cheer. I’m completely oblivious.

This holds true until we reach the halfway mark about 30 seconds faster than goal pace. The celebrations within our group wake me from my trance, just as both Achilles remind me they are not having much fun.

Miles 13-17

I knew I was gonna take a beating, I was just hoping it wouldn’t be this soon into the race. But it is.

Keeping pace isn’t so much of an issue, but keeping pace with the annoyance of Achilles pain is. With each compounded step I can feel the calcaneal bursa sacs rubbing against the back of my shoes — tender and inflamed. I try to convince myself that it will all go away, but I’m not as stupid as I think I am, and the convincing doesn’t succeed.

This is where I should be sucking it up. This is where I should be lowering my head and digging deep.

Instead, this is where I begin to think about alternative goals.

But why!?! some part of my conscience interjects. You’re right with the 3:10 group. You’re fine! Just keep going! You can rest your heels when you’re done!

Every time this voice encourages me, its mirror opposite gets in the way:

You’re not in 3:10 shape, dude. You’re not gonna make it. Just take it easy. No use fighting. You’re gonna conk out any minute now. Just wait and see.

Back and forth they go, those voices in my head.

Don’t lose the group!

     You’re gonna lose the group.

Don’t listen to that asshole!

    This asshole wants you to be able to walk tomorrow.

As the argument builds, so too do my efforts to stay with the group. It becomes increasingly difficult with each step. The latter asshole voice gets louder. Still, I hang on.

Until…

Mile 17-23

Everythiiiiiiiing sloooooooooooows dooooooooooooooooowwwwwwn.

Boom. Just like that. The wheels fall off and there is no question: 3:10 pace is too much.

Yes, my heels hurt, but it’s not my heels that shut me down, it’s my cardiovascular system.

My body has had enough of that pace and it refuses to go any further unless I slow it down. Every muscle, every breath is against running another step at that pace.

Before giving in completely, I put forth one last valiant effort to catch back up to the 3:10 team now quickly disappearing before my eyes and… I… struggle… to…

Fuck it. Just not gonna happen today.

I take about 30 seconds to feel sorry for myself, to wallow in my shattered hopes. And then I recall Ali Tremaine’s words:

No matter how bad I feel a run or race went, there is always a part of running where I am smiling from ear to ear.

Hot damn, yes! That’s the perspective I was looking for! Mentally, I put on my big boy pants, hold myself a little taller, and keep on moving.

I’m still RUNNING! In the CHICAGO MARATHON! And all these strangers are cheering for me, so let’s go!

Suddenly 8:30 pace doesn’t feel so bad, in fact, it feels GREAT!

I go through Pilsen on 18th street screaming “Viva Mexico!”

I turn right onto Halsted and high five my buddy Omar.

I turn left onto Archer and stop to give my girlfriend a great big hug and kiss.

Before I get to Chinatown, I stop to take a piss.

Feeling infinitely better now that my bladder is empty, I charge down Wentworth, tucked in close to the crowd for support, smiling ear to ear.

At mile 23 I see my friend Alison, so I stop to give her a big hug, and now I’m really feeling good. Well, I’m feeling as good as a fatigued, wonky-heeled runner with 23 miles in his legs can feel.

I’m still movin’ ain’t I!?!?

Miles 23-26.2

Ah, yes, here we are on the home stretch down Michigan Avenue. This part of the race sure does feel different knowing that I won’t accomplish my goal for the day, but the warmth from the enthusiastic crowd cheering me regardless and the perfectly blue skies above remind me that I am indeed lucky to be where I am right now.

Be glad you can run, period.

I am.

And eat some humble pie, dude. 

I will.

Enjoy the last few miles to the finish.

Absolutely. I make eye contact with volunteers. I high five random kids. I smile big and cheesy.

Then someone pinches my butt.

WHAT THE–

I turn around to see it’s John, my pacer friend. Apparently his knee issues came up and slowed him down too. But he’s smiling! And moving relatively well (faster than me) as he darts on by.

“Wasn’t expecting a butt pinch 2 miles from the finish line, John, but I’ll take it!” I yell as he speeds on by.

I laugh to myself all the way to Mt. Roosevelt before I make the last left turn towards the finish line. It’s a good day after all. It’s a good day indeed.

3 hours and 20 minutes after I took off on this journey, I am humbled and finally done.

One minute later, I have a beer in my hand.

Two minutes later, I’m thinking about the next marathon.

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Post-Race

A very wise person once told me that I should learn something from every race, regardless of the outcome. Well, I learned a whole lot in this one.

I learned that, just like anything else in life, a race is what you make of it. If you want to feel sorry for yourself and miss the beauty of reality, then that’s on you. Attitude is paramount. And with the right perspective, one can truly find joy, even in defeat.

I also learned that it’s okay to give myself a break every once in a while. Setting goals and being productive towards achieving them is great, but it shouldn’t come at the expense of my health.

But most of all, I was reminded that running is what matters for me. It’s not speed, not distance. It’s not splits or weather or terrain.

It’s running.

Running brings me to the state of now.

And that’s where I always want to be.

6 responses

  1. Dan

    One thing you nail every time in your race stories that I can’t seem to properly execute – though not for a lack of trying – is the duel that goes in in our heads as we try and maintain pace. What I like about your descriptions is that you approach that uncanny valley of sounding truly insane without actually doing so. And that’s a high compliment by the by.

    Anyway, it’s a shame that I didn’t see you zoom by at either mile 11 or 25.8. I was looking for a shirtless dude with a close cut and not a neon singlet with a mohawk. My bad.

    Let’s get a beer in the south loop one of these days.

    October 22, 2013 at 09:39

    • Yes! Let’s! As far as the duel in my head, man, those guys duke it out every time. Haha!

      October 31, 2013 at 14:32

  2. fantastic race report! thanks for sharing.

    October 22, 2013 at 15:44

  3. Pingback: The Awesomeness of Nothingness | TheRunFactory.com

  4. Pingback: 2013: A Year of Patience, Perseverance and Perspective | TheRunFactory.com

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