Running up, over and through the cogs

Halted by Humidity (and Reality?): The 2014 Armadillo Dash Half Marathon Race Report

armadillo running

Despite months of training through the polar vortex, mounds of snow and an insufferable treadmill, I went into The Armadillo Dash Half Marathon in College Station, Texas with pretty high hopes. I knew that the peculiar training patterns weren’t ideal, but I figured my mental toughness edge and increased strength training would power me closer to a new personal best.

I was totally wrong.

And I knew it before we even started.

Pre-Race
Saturday, March 1, 2014

A thousand miles away from Hoth, Edna and I are in Conroe, TX. We’ve ditched our layers of neoprene and collection of balaclavas for a simple pair of shorts and singlet. We are out for a shake-out jog around my dad’s neighborhood and despite a few wild dogs barking at my pasty white legs, all is well.

It’s mild. It’s bright. It’s awesome.

Glowing in the natural warmth of the sun — something I haven’t done in six long months — I can’t help but smile. This is what we’ve been waiting for. This is what we miss. This is medicine for the sun-deprived sickness that is a bonafide Chicago winter!

And it’s humid.

I’m sweating. A lot. I’m running slow. But I’m sweating profusely. The air is fresh, but it is thick.

I’m not trained for this, I think to myself. The mood is so good that I really don’t want to crash it with a Debbie Downer quip, so I just let it go.

Go by heart rate, I tell myself. Go out at a race pace heart rate and just stick with that. And for god’s sake please stop taking the fun out of these races. Enjoy yourself damn it!

I give myself good advice sometimes.

Edna and I finish our run and I am completely at peace with my proposed protocol, which makes the rest of the day and evening that much more enjoyable. We go to packet pick-up, spend quality time with family under the sun and eat a hearty Mexican meal before getting to bed early.

Pre-Race
Sunday, March 2, 2014
4:30 a.m.

We have a 7 a.m. start today, so we’re up and moving early. I repeat the same pre-race ritual I always perform: coffee, banana, bagel.

Grease, nipple-tape, kit.

We’re out the door by 5:15 a.m.

The drive is dark and quiet. Dad is driving and it’s about an hour from his place to College Station. I fight sleep while occasionally attempting conversation.

Pre-Race
6:20 a.m.

We arrive at Veteran’s Park and step out of the car to an air temperature of about 65 degrees. The air is thick. It’s humid with a chance of rain.

Edna and I still can’t believe we’re in shorts and singlets.

But we are.

We go through the rest of our pre-race routines, give each other and my dad a hug and then break off towards the start line.

I line up near the front.

There’s not much of a crowd. The highest bib number I’ve seen is 900-something and just from looking around I can tell this is a pretty small race. Near the start line lurks a handful of sinewy young bucks donning short-shorts that make mine look like Hammer pants. I make sure to give them plenty of distance, finding a spot a few rows back.

National anthem. A speech.

And we’re off!

Miles 1-7

Bang! I’m right out of the gate and a voracious mob flies by me. The newbie rush is in full effect.

I try not to be a judgmental asshole, but when you’re huffing and puffing and dying for breath 20 strides into a half marathon, maybe you should slow down.

I start out at a comfortable pace, passing the huffers and puffers falling off along the way. I take notice of my surroundings — flat and gray — and try to settle into a comfortably quick cadence. I look down at my watch.

160 BPM! What the–???

I’m barely doing anything and already… what the… how can my heart rate be this high? Surely this is a faulty heart rate monitor.

BAM. I step on the gas, wait a few seconds, check my watch:

170. Yikes. Now I’M huffing and puffing.

I slow back down to 165 BPM and vow to keep it there the rest of the day. This translates to a 7:40-ish pace, a very far cry from 6:50 pace just six months ago.

Oh well. Dems da breaks.

I remind myself that I run because it’s fun and a good way to stay in shape, not to impress people who don’t even care with split times and PRs.

My focus turns to the course, but honestly, there’s not much to see. We follow a highway shoulder dotted with the occasional group of supporters. To their credit, the folks who are out on the course cheering us on are a boisterous lot.

The only thing missing is a cowbell, which seems ironic considering that much of this course follows roads lined by cow pastures. There seems to be a lot of them in this part of Texas. This probably explains why every time I come here I have the sudden urge to don a 10 gallon hat, dinner plate belt buckle and good old fashioned shit-kickers.

Maybe next time.

At mile 4 I am running shoulder-to-shoulder with a girl I’ve been yo-yo-ing with thus far. It appears she has had enough of the back and forth. She sits right on my wheel and we are moving together, stride for stride.

Not a word is said.

I start to play the mind game How long will this last?

Mile 5… I check my watch. 165 BPM.

Mile 6… Holding steady. Still at 165. Feeling good.

Mile 7. BAM! She breaks stride and heads straight for a porta-john.

I’ve been there, totally know the feeling.

Without the stereo of her feet pounding pavement beside me, I come out of the zone and notice how much I’m sweating.

Wow! This ain’t no polar vortex! Yee ha!

Miles 7-12

The first half of this race has gone by quickly. I’m running totally on automatic. I look down at my watch — a lot, too much probably — and every time I do it’s reading a 165 BPM.

Everything is smooth. Everything is the same.

Including my surroundings. Still on a highway. Still in the middle of vast cattle country. Still gray skies.

Rain spits down in unpredictable increments. Sometimes with gusto, sometime barely at all.

The aid stations are really the only respite from the stretched (and dare I say boring) silence. I welcome the high-fives and fluids each time I pass through before immediately finding myself back on quiet, open road. Often times races are a great way to tour an area, a great way to see and experience a city. Here, unless cow pastures for miles is your thing, there isn’t much to see or experience.

That doesn’t mean this is a bad race. It’s not. It’s perfectly fine. All the essentials are here. I have no complaints. The people are friendly and encouraging. The course is easy. The temperature isn’t freezing and I’m not traversing through mounds of snow or ankle breaking post holes.

There just aren’t any bells and whistles. And in a world where races fight each other for entrants by dangling bells and whistles ad nauseum, the absence of such is noticed.

But my mileage barely is. The 12-mile mark appears out of nowhere and I take comfort in knowing I’m almost done. A quick glance at my watch shows I’m still at 165 BPM.

Time to turn it up a notch.

Miles 12-13.1

BOOM. As if Mother Nature were timing her rainy surprise to coincide with my hard push to the finish, the gray skies open up and pour down some refreshing rain.

When was the last time I got to play in the rain? I ask myself. Man, this is fun!

As I make my way down the last stretch of highway that will loop us back into the park, I look down to see I’m pushing 180 now. My cadence picks up even more when I hear the PA announcer muffle something accompanied by cheers from the small yet audible crowd.

I turn left towards the finish line, kick hard, and about 100 yards from the finish I hear my dad, my sister Emily and her boyfriend Sam call out my name.

I try to look good for their sake as I finish with a time of 1:41:47.

Post-Race

Dad, Emily, Sam and I all stick around for Edna to finish. It’s not long before I notice her from far away. Her spry gait in silhouette quickly draws near. We watch intently as her trademark smile glows its familiar glow while she runs past us into the shoot.

A few quick hugs and congratulations later and Sam snaps this picture:the lungs at the armadillo dash

Shortly after that and the skies REALLY open up.

IT POURS.

We get out of there before I even know I won my age group.

- – -

An obsessive’s brain, if left unchecked, will obsess. That’s what it does. That’s what it knows.

Was I slower than I wanted to be because of the humidity? The lower mileage in training? The polar vortex?

Am I getting enough sleep? Am I past my prime? Am I a slave to the technology?

I don’t know. And the more I check the obsession, the less I care. It’s okay, Jeff, I tell myself. Everything’s okay. You run because you love it and because you can.

Now go get yourself a beer.

- – -

The Boston Marathon is less that six weeks away, and while I know a sub-3 hour finish is not a realistic goal right now, I’m still hoping a re-qualifying time (3:10) or a Chicago Marathon qualifer (3:15) is.

If not, well, I won’t have much time to feel sorry for myself. There’s a 24 hour race and 100 miler in my near future.

2 responses

  1. Dan

    Don’t I know the feeling. My four fastest marathons have been in the 3:20s, but in Miami’s sticky humidity I struggled to run under 4:00. I barely got to run outside in all of January OR February, and it’s not until THIS WEEK that I might do all of my runs outside. This winter has been one to remember. For the love of %$&# it has just been the worst. “Glad” to see I wasn’t the only one who struggled to keep the speed up.

    But there’s hope on the horizon and soon we’ll all be dotting the paths with our soles, re-building all that winter-drained strength. This post also got me thinking that I should start training with a heart-rate monitor. Any advice for that?

    March 11, 2014 at 14:46

    • HR Monitors do help I think. I like them because I know that if I go by HR then I know what certain efforts “feel” like and that I am doing what I set out to do in any one workout. Check out that “running on feel” article (link: http://strengthrunning.com/2014/03/running-by-feel/ ). I’ve used the HR monitor to transition into that sort of training. My body seems to fluctuate in what it can do day to day so training like that seems to help me. At least, it does mentally. I think? Haha. How’s that for an answer.

      March 11, 2014 at 15:01

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