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Bustin’ Down the Door of My First 24: The 2014 Christmas in July 24 Hour Race Report

Christmas in July 24 Hour, Lisle, IL (Image courtesy of Scott Laudick, http://runnerpics.smugmug.com)

2014 Christmas in July 24 Hour, Lisle, IL (Image courtesy of Scott Laudick)

Bran thought about it. “Can a man be brave if he’s afraid?”

“That is the only time a man can be brave,” his father told him.

George R. R. Martin, A Game of Thrones


Thursday, July 17, 2014

I can’t sleep — tossing, turning, terrified.

What have I gotten myself into?

Just last week, I suffered through 6 hours and 24 minutes of a tough trail 50k, body throbbing with fatigue, thinking I don’t want to run another step as I crossed the finish line. Now, on the eve of the longest race of my life, a 24 Hour event on a .97 mile asphalt loop, the thought of quadrupling that pain is overwhelming.

Breathe, Jeff. Relax. Focus on your breath.

This mantra gets me to sleep, eventually. Yet, I still wake several times, jolted from slumber by dreams that I’d missed the start, trapped in a port-a-john, or that I wimped out completely, unwilling to test my body.

Breathe, Jeff. Relax. Focus on your breath.

Friday, July 18, 2014

I’m up at 5:30 a.m. for work, and for the next 7 hours I don’t really think too much about what’s going to happen later tonight. Some of my clients ask me about the race: What’s your strategy? Do you think you can last the whole 24? What will you eat?

I’m not really sure. But I keep smiling, agreeing that this may be the craziest thing I’ve done up to this point.

At one o’clock I eat a big lunch of rice and beans and then head straight home. I close the blinds, wrap a t-shirt over my head to block out the light and lie down in bed — heart rate higher than I’d like, mind beginning to wander.

Breathe, Jeff. Relax. Focus on your breath.

Deep inhale. Deep exhale. Repeat.

5:00 p.m.

My alarm goes off and I wake up feeling refreshed, strong, ready for insanity.

I gather my things, load the car and join rush hour traffic on I-55 South. The plan is to go to Edna’s house first, have dinner with her, and let her drive me to the race in Lisle.

Traffic is heavy, but expected. I listen to the news to distract myself.

7:30 p.m.

Edna and I are at one of our favorite Mexican restaurants. Steak tacos with more beans and rice. I’m careful to eat until I’m full, but not to stuff myself. Our conversation is light and focuses on our respective days thus far and not so much about the race. Being an ultra veteran, Edna knows the types of thoughts going through my head — How much will it hurt? Will I be able to endure? What if I fail? — and she does her best to shift my focus to more positive thoughts.

8:30 p.m.

The drive to Lisle on Route 53 is spent listening to classic Ricky Martin tunes (La Bomba, Así Es la VidaPerdido Sin Ti) interspersed with last-minute, calming words of caution from Edna. I try to not read too much into the subliminal messages of the song titles, which translate to: The Bomb, That’s Life, Lost Without You.

“Run your own race, mi amor. Don’t run anybody else’s race,” says Edna.

She sings along with Ricky for a bit.

“You have to run on your own. You have to know you can do these distances on your own,” she continues.

Perdido sin ti…

“But the most important thing?” she continues, taking a moment to look me dead in the eye, “Enjoy the pain.”

Breathe, Jeff. Relax. Focus on your breath.

9:00 p.m.

At Lisle Community Park now, we head towards the packet pick-up table where I check in, get my bib (#3) and exchange greetings with the first of many friends and familiar faces I will see over the next day. The sun is down, the temperature is in the mid 60s and I quickly become a feast for a hungry swarm of mosquitos.

“Didn’t think I would need this today,” I say grabbing the can of OFF! sitting on the check-in table. I douse myself in chemicals and know that I will be nothing but a progressively filthy mess from here on out.

Comfortably guarded against the mosquito invasion, Edna and I walk to the Start/Finish line. I drop off my drop bags and begin my normal preparations of bladder draining, lubricating, mental focussing. The process is occasionally broken up by the buzz of adrenaline and a constant stream of greetings from friends. Like at most ultras, there’s a lot of hugging and high-fiving going on, with strategic pre-race selfies thrown in when possible.

Festive, summery smiles! From left to right, back row: Danny, Caleb, Me, Melissa, Chuck. Front: Edna, Nate, Kelly, Baby Levi. (Image courtesy of Nate Pualengco)

Festive, summery smiles! From left to right, back row: Danny, Caleb, Me, Melissa, Chuck. Front: Edna, Nate, Kelly, Baby Levi. (Image courtesy of Nate Pualengco)

I spend a few minutes chatting with each race director individually: Brian Gaines, Ed Kelly and Terry Madl. Each one of them offers me unwavering encouragement, making me feel confident. I look all around at the awesome Christmas in July atmosphere they have created with lights, trees and gigantic nutcrackers; I feel like I’m in good place. I feel like I’m about to embark upon something special.

I am so glad I am here.

The winners will go home with these bad boys. (Image courtesy of Scott Laudick, http://runnerpics.smugmug.com)

The winners will go home with these bad boys. (Image courtesy of Scott Laudick)

Just minutes from the start, I give Edna a big hug and kiss and line up with the rest of the 24 hour runners. There is a pre-race speech over a megaphone. I can hardly hear it over my elevated heart rate and anxious thoughts.

Focus on the breath, I tell myself.

As I do, I can hear Edna’s parting advice bouncing off the space in my mind.

Enjoy the pain, she said, her beautiful smile stealing away any juxtaposing thoughts.

We do enjoy the pain, don’t we? I ask myself.

Before I can delve into that thought further, the race begins and I’m taking my first steps of an event that won’t end for another TWENTY. FOUR. HOURS.

The Start/Finish Line (Image courtesy of Paul Lonis)

(Image courtesy of Paul Lonis)

Hours 1 – 7 (10 p.m. – 5 a.m.)

Run easy, run relaxed, figure out the course.

This is my mission for the first few loops. Other than lasting the entire 24 hours of the race, my only real goal is to see if I can log 80 miles or more. Eighty miles would be a 29-mile distance personal record, and I know that in order to conserve energy and maintain enough endurance to get there, I’m going to need to mix in a good deal of walking.

I like consistency. I like routine. The looped course suits me well so I will take advantage of it.

As we pass the stage where a band plays live Christmas music, we head up the first (and only significant) hill — one that I will power hike every, single, time. As we walk, I hear the usual ornery exclamations of “almost there”, “looking good” and “only a little more to go” from runners and spectators alike.

At the top of the hill is a magnificently huge inflatable snowman, brilliantly lit up against a cool, black night. We make a hard right turn and go up another short incline before we hit a long, smooth downhill. The path is paved (sorry, knees) and there isn’t a need for head lamps because the course is lit with luminaries on either side.

At the bottom of the hill is a short bridge which leads us past another bright snowman, this one alone by a creek. We cross the bridge and hang a winding right that reaches a fork marked with a “Merry Christmas” sign, having us turn right along a course that will take us back to Short Street, the road we came in on off 53. We pass another inflatable, festive treat — this time Santa, a reindeer and a polar bear, chilling in what looks like a hot tub? — before we reach the end of the path, marked with two port-a-johns (port-a-johns I will get to know intimately, of course). At the end of the path we turn right onto a sidewalk that takes us past a fantastically large inflatable Santa Claus monitoring the course, near packet pick-up. This sidewalk leads us all the way to the Lisle High School parking lot where we take a right and run about 200 meters back to the Start/Finish.

Boom. That’s it. That’s the course.

One loop, two loops, three…

By the fourth, I already have my pattern set and will not waver for the duration of the event:

Walk through the aid station. Continue walking while eating and drinking as we approach the base of the hill. Powerhike the hill. Run the straightaway towards the sharp right turn. Walk the sharp right turn and power hike the short incline to the beginning of the downhill. Run the downhill (bomb when I can). Walk over the bridge. Run from the bridge to the “Merry Christmas” sign marking the fork. Walk to Santa/reindeer/polar bear hot tub. Run to the port-a-johns. Walk to the sidewalk. Run from gigantic Santa to the 20 mph hour road sign (don’t want to get a ticket for speeding after all). Walk to the parking lot. Run it in to the Start/Finish.

Repeat.

A lot.

Edna is there for the first couple of hours. She cheers for me every time I come through, putting a big smile on my face. Around midnight she gives me a final hug and kiss before she goes home for the night. I won’t see her until the end, tomorrow evening sometime.

One last kiss for the night. (Image courtesy of Scott Laudick)

One last kiss for the night. (Image courtesy of Scott Laudick)

Enjoy the pain, I hear her say in my head.

Sage advice.

Running, walking, running, walking, running…

It doesn’t take long before I’m in a real good groove. For the first few hours I’m hitting 10-12 minute miles consistently. When I walk, I make sure I walk with a purpose. I pump my arms, move my hips.

Think mall-walker.

I drink every loop. Every, single, loop. Since the course is so short, I can conserve energy by not carrying a bottle, but this means I need to take in fluids every time around. I drink water mostly, with the occasional Gatorade. I eat something every other loop.

Chowing down at the aid station. (Image courtesy of Scott Laudick)

Chowing down at the aid station. (Image courtesy of Scott Laudick)

The aid station is stocked! All the usual fare is here: chips, cookies, fruit, salty items, candies. I practice my “see food” diet by taking a look around and just grabbing a bite or two of whatever looks good at that particular time. Pizza arrives after a while and that looks particularly awesome. I chow down.

Eating and running is something I have gotten really good at through my ultra training the last couple of years. I try to stay away from sugary stuff, unless my body calls for it, and I make sure I don’t run too hard in the few minutes immediately after eating any significant amount of something. Being in tune with my body is something I take a lot of pride in. I listen to it and react on the fly. In my opinion, this is an essential skill for running super long distances.

Shit is going to happen. Be prepared and be flexible.

Right now, in these dark hours, I feel ready for anything. It gets a little chilly so I switch to a shirt with sleeves and tick off the miles without really much thought. The 12-hour and 6-hour runners, who started at 11 p.m. and 12 a.m. respectively, share the course with us and make me feel slightly slow as they dart by at a pace I wish I could run.

Run your own race, mi amor, I hear Edna say in my mind. Don’t run anyone else’s race.

Shan Riggs, local elite and winner of the 2014 Indiana Trail 100, flies by me too many times to count. I marvel at his abilities, but know I can’t chase. He’s the favorite to win the 24 hours. I hope he does.

A guy in blue flies by me a bunch of times too running a pace that makes me think he’s a 6 or 12-hour runner. Or maybe he just likes to suffer. We all do. Right?

Why ARE you doing this? I ask myself.

To see what I’m capable of. To discover something new about myself. To enhance my experience of life.

At the five-hour mark, very comfortable and still feeling fresh, I check in with the timer to see how many miles I have. He reports I have logged 23+ miles, a number I feel pretty good about. Doing the math in my head, 80 miles seems like a lock, if I can just stick with this plan. I grab some pizza to celebrate this little victory and chomp on it a bit before I remind myself that I have a loooooong way to go.

No need to get excited about anything yet, I tell myself. Focus on the now. Feel every step. Live every breath.

“Way to go, runner! Yay! WOO HOO!” cheers Cynthia, a girl perfectly positioned at the base of the big hill — the spot where I always feel like the hill is getting bigger. Cynthia is a trooper. A champion spectator. She has been here since the very first loop and she doesn’t leave until sometime after sunrise.

Seven plus hours of non-stop cheering.

Cynthia, wherever you are, you are my hero.

Hours 7 – 10 (5 a.m. – 8 a.m.)

Sunrise over Lisle. (Image courtesy of Tony Weyers)

Sunrise over Lisle. (Image courtesy of Tony Weyers)

The sun comes up and, for the first time, I can see the whole course from the top of the hill. My fellow runners dart around the loopty loop path, working hard, working steady, ant-like, off in the distance.

I’ve been working right along with them, focusing on the now, one moment at a time. surprisingly, when I try to think about what I’ve been thinking about the last 7 hours, I can’t really remember anything. I’m stuck in the moment — each one, as it comes, moving meditation.

Running, walking, eating, drinking, thinking NOW, NOW, NOW, running, walking, eating, drinking, thinking NOW, NOW, NOW…

And peeing. I’m peeing. A lot. Every two miles. It’s kind of annoying.

“Is it normal to pee this much?” I ask Cindy, one of the aid station volunteers whom you will likely see at any ultra race in the area. Her husband is an ultra vet and I suspect she’s seen it all.

“Yes, it means your kidneys are doing their job. As long as you’re drinking, that’s a good thing.”

“Sweet.”

Run, walk, eat, drink, PEE, think NOW NOW NOW… groove. Smile. Enjoy!

The 6-hour runners finish at 6 a.m., freeing up the course a bit. There were times where it was a little crowded, but nothing I couldn’t weave in and out of. When I circle back to the Start/Finish I find out that my friend, Todd Brown, won his 6-hour.

“Awesome!” I tell him with a fist-bump. “You looked awesome out there!”

He did. He lapped me a bunch. I use his positive outcome as fuel for a series of harder effort loops. The sun will be baking me soon, so I need to take advantage of these last couple of cool hours. I crank it up a bit on the run sections.

Still truckin', shortly after sunrise. (Image courtesy of Hersh Ajgaonkar)

Still truckin’, shortly after sunrise. (Image courtesy of Hersh Ajgaonkar)

Starting to feel it. Tired. Heavy.

It has been a slow, steady disintegration from what I was doing in the first few hours. This was expected, of course, yet I always seem to be surprised by just how much I feel it.

And I’ve been running all this way on pavement. Pavement. What were you thinking, Jeff?

I smile back at my brief negativity.

I like pavement, I tell myself. I can run faster.

You mean COULD run faster. Right now ain’t so fast.

Yeah. So? Maybe I’m enjoying the pain.

My inner monologue is interrupted along the back straightaway heading towards Short Street when I see my friends Tony and Hersh, both ultrarunners themselves, flanked on either side of the path.

“Hey, Jeff!” says Hersh. “How do you feel?”

I tilt my head to the side, invite a smile and say, “Why are we so stupid?”

They share a hearty laugh as I continue on with my run slow torture.

I am running still, but like I noted earlier, my run isn’t very quick. I don’t really know my exact pace, but I know I’m slowing down. My legs are dragging a bit and I am starting to feel… blisters.

Ah, yes. Blisters.

Shit.

I knew this might happen.

DAMN YOU, HOKAS!

Up until recently, blisters have been a non-issue in my running career. A proud follower of routine, I found out early on that by keeping my callusses filed while using 2Toms Blistershield, Injinji socks, Nike Vomeros (road) and Salomon Speed Cross (trail), I would not have to deal with blisters. Every great once in a while a teeny one would show up, but very rarely. I am happy to say I have been nearly blister free since I became a runner.

However, with Achilles issues that have kept me from feeling my absolute best lingering the last year or so, I decided to try different shoes. Hokas, with their big, pillowy, comfy ride, seemed like a good choice. Lots of ultrarunners love them, including Edna, so I bought the Bondi 3s a few months ago and have been training in them regularly.

For the bottoms of my feet, and especially for my Achilles, they are awesome. The support is phenomenal and I don’t feel the hard ground/rocks/roots underneath me when I run. They work great for both road and trail.

Except they sometimes give me blisters.

They give me blisters on both heels and on both pinky toes. I have dealt with this before. They blistered me at Mohican. They blistered me at Dances with Dirt. Yet sometimes they don’t blister me at all, and with the smooth pavement in lieu of rugged terrain, I was hoping today would be one of those days.

It’s not.

Left heel is getting rubbed pretty badly. Both pinky toes are feeling it too.

It’s about 8 a.m. I’m feeling sluggish. The sun is beating down. Time to assess some damage.

For the first time in 10 hours, I sit down next to my drop bag and take off my shoes.

“Ahhh, shit,” I can’t help but say. “Damn it.”

It’s my left heel. Big blister. Welled up pretty good. “That one’s gonna have to pop,” I say as I dig out my first aid kit and start prepping my mind for fixing gnarly feet, what I like to call “surgery”.

Everywhere I go running I take my gear bag — a $30 tackle box from Target with lots of pockets, containers and compartments. The first aid section, stocked with needles, scissors, tape, antibiotics, moleskin and more, has come in handy only a couple of times so far, but those have always been desperate times. Facing 14 more hours of running, it’s better to fix things now, while I still have a chance.

I pop the big blister — yikes this thing is big! — on the back of the left heel and let it drain. I do the same with the one on the pinky toe. They both sting. After they’re drained I put on some Neosporin and wrap the pinky toe with a couple of band aids. I’m wearing toe socks, so the band aids should stay. For the heel blister I cut out a large moleskin square and try to adhere it over the blister. Unfortunately, I’m very sweaty, and the moleskin is not sticking.

Duct tape.

I grab my roll of duct tape and rip off a large section. The ripping sound causes heads to turn and I hear someone say “Uh oh, getting serious now that the duct tape is out”.

It ain’t pretty, but I manage to keep the moleskin in place with a thorough wrapping. I put on some clean socks and massage my feet a bit before I put my shoes back on and stand up, slowly.

“Doesn’t feel too bad,” I say out loud. I take a step and immediately feel the salty stinginess in my open wounds. “Ouch!”

Well, you didn’t think it was going to be all roses, did ya?

Before I can dwell too much on my feet, I take off my shirt and busy myself with applying sunscreen. The sun is getting higher and hotter and the course offers scarcely any shade. I don’t want to become a lobster, so I rub it on thick.

This stop has taken too long, I think to myself as I check my watch. You need to get going.

It’s been 10 hours now, so I check in with the timer to find I’ve logged a little over 44 miles total. Pretty even with my first 5 hours. What’s 14 more hours? I joke to myself.

My other self is not amused.

Hours 10 – 15 (8 a.m. – 1 p.m.)

With each loop I complete I feel the sun beat down stronger, hotter, burning into my skin, through my muscles and into bone. This distracts me from my blistery feet, so much that I don’t notice them anymore. I try to see the positive in this as I focus on maintaining my run/walk rhythm, but it’s evident that mother nature is trying put me down for the count.

So… slug…gish… now…

I still see the same faces on the course, but much of the high energy is gone. It looks like I’m not the only runner dying in the sun. I make sure I stay hydrated at the aid station every time I pass through; and since I’m still peeing every two miles or so, I know I’m doing a good job. Still, I can’t seem to run much more than an old man shuffle.

The 12-hour runners finish at 11 a.m., leaving the course quite empty now as we surviving 24-hour runners try to hold on and avoid thinking about having ELEVEN MORE HOURS to go. There is carnage all around, especially at the Start/Finish line where some 24-hour runners have already tapped out, or are thinking about it. I HAVE ELEVEN MORE HOURS TO GO. Feet up, shoes off. Some of these people look happy with their decisions but I can’t let myself think about such a thing and besides there are ELEVEN MORE HOURS.

Food helps me get back on track. There is bacon now and if I can run for anything I can run for bacon.

BACON!

Pancakes and hash browns are served too but BACON is really all I want. All told I have about 10 pieces in an hour’s time. Its rich, fat juiciness takes me to a happy place — Baconland, where you run mad in circles under the sun and suffer senselessly for the reward of tasting bacon’s flavorful fattiness with each successful loop.

Welcome to Baconland, Sir. Enjoy your pain!

Why thank you! And oh, look, they have Santa Claus in Baconland! And a gigantic snowman atop the hill. And a hot tub with Santa, a reindeer and a polar bear.

Bacon is good, no doubt, but my legs ache, my feet hurt, I’m fried and falling asleep. Even though my mind is telling me to run, I can’t seem to remember how. Toasty and sleepy, I zombie walk an entire loop, talking to myself. I am all alone and estoy sufriendo.

I am… suffering. Edna?

Enjoy your pain…

This is haaaaaarrrrrd. Es muy dificil, mi amor. Estoy sufriendo. Mucho. Mucho, mucho, mucho.

Enjoy your pain.

She always enjoys her pain. Her smile never ceases, even in her hardest of trials. I’ve seen it with my own eyes.

I can do this, I remind myself. Just keep moving. Get to the aid station.

I am on the sidewalk parallel to Short Street now, baking, frying, bacon? No. Water? Yes. Sleep? No. RUN! I can’t. WALK! I am. FASTER! Shut up!

I hit the blacktop parking lot and try to run. Always run the homestretch, I tell myself. But I can’t. I really can’t.

I stumble into the drop bag area like a defeated fighter after 12 rounds. Where’s my stool?

“Are you okay?” asks my friend, Melissa. Melissa is crewing today and she’s been helpful throughout, aiding and cheering runners since the beginning of the race.

“Not really.” I say, eyes glazed.

“You’re really hot,” she says placing a hand on my forehead. “You need to cool down.”

“And wake up. I’m falling asleep.”

“You need to cool down. That will help you wake up.”

I grab my buff and a Red Bull from my bag. Melissa pours the Red Bull in a cup with ice. I drink it and the cold on my tongue feels like an alarm clock for my brain, the caffeine a dance party.

“Whoa.” I say.

“You need to cool down,” she says, taking my arm and leading me over to a kiddie pool next to the aid station. “Bend down and dunk your head in this water. It will feel really good.”

Trusting her, I kneel down (SLOWLY), and do as she says.

VRRRRROOOOOOMYAAAAAAAMMAAALAMMMAAAAADINGDONG!!!

“Wow! That is COLD!” I say, more awake than I can remember being.

She pours more cold water on my neck, each handful washing away the fatigue that had hobbled me so.

“Wow, yes, that’s what I needed.”

“You have to keep cool,” she reminds me as I soak my buff in the water and put ice in it before wrapping it around my neck.

I chug the rest of my Red Bull, thank her for her help, and head back out for another loop.

Determined. Back to life. Running!

It’s amazing what some ice cold water and caffeine can do.

I run/walk the loop as before, now at a steady, lively pace. Man, I was really losing it there for a second, I think.

It comes in waves, I recall someone said to me once, when you feel bad just hold on. It will go away, eventually.

Perhaps, but now that I’m awake, I do feel my feet more. The blisters. The rubbing. The aching.

I run a bit with Raul, another ultra guerrero, and after hearing my complaints, he suggests a shoe change. “Did wonders for me,” he said. He too had on Hokas at first. After some uncomfortable rubbing from them, he switched back to his old shoes and was feeling better.

“Couldn’t hurt,” I say, noticing the irony of my words. Oh, yes, it could. It COULD hurt. It WILL hurt.

Everything hurts.

My right IT band starts to hurt. Right hip flexor too. Before they get too cranky, I whip out the RumbleRoller and dig in like hell, causing heads to turn at my seemingly masochistic ground acrobatics.

“It hurts so good,” I say to the bystanders.

“Jeff, you look so much better now,” says Melissa.

“Thanks. Yeah, I feel way better. No doubt. You saved me.”

Seems like I am in need of a lot of saving. The RumbleRoller wins the prize this round. I stand up and feel like I have new legs (but the same tired feet).

“Let’s go for a run!” I shout as I take off with a smile.

Run… walk… run… walk… eat, drink, pee…

Repeat.

Again.

And again.

All is well. I’m awake. I’m taking care of my body and not getting too hot.

Yet my feet…

You have to change your shoes, I tell myself. Just do it. You can’t keep going like this.

My pace is slowing. I’m suffering again. What the hell am I doing here?

Hours 15 – 21 (1 p.m. – 7 p.m.)

Enjoying the pain? I’m still smiling. Are you smiling because you’re happy or are you smiling because you want to be happy?

I’m smiling because I’m ALIVE. And with every sensation throbbing tenfold, I feel really fucking alive right now, man.

After changing out of the Hokas and into the Nike Vomeros, I feel even MORE alive. Achey, creaky and slow, but alive.

Why didn’t I do that earlier? I ask myself. Who cares, just run!

I run. I run to my walking point, walk to my running point, eating and drinking all the while. Everything is done with focus, with purpose. Keep moving. Keep going. Don’t quit.

I follow this pattern until I’m slowed, once again, to walk an entire loop. This time my friends Brandt and Jerret are around and they ask if they can walk a loop with me. I welcome the company. I try not to talk too much about what hurts (everything) but I can’t help it. I feel weak.

Knowing that I’m around 70ish miles now, Brandt reminds me that every step is a new distance PR — a thought that does a lot for my confidence. “Yeah, you’re right,” I say. “Every single step!”

The walk and the camraderie gives me a boost and I start to think more positively. Still aching from my physical pain, I take 400 mg of Ibuprofen, wash it down with another Red Bull and vow to get serious.

Time to crank, Jeffery. Time to crank.

(Image courtesy of Hersh Ajgaonkar)

(Image courtesy of Hersh Ajgaonkar)

The sun is still beating down, but I’m regulating well with lots of ice in my cap and in my buff. I dunk my head every once in a while too. I get back into a groove with my run/walk, but I’m still feeling quite fatigued. I keep fighting. Head down. Focused on my task: TO MOVE! I labor on for several more loops.

Then, as I start to shuffle down the big hill heading towards the wooden bridge, I notice that with each step I’m feeling less and less aches. What the — ?

Am I dreaming?

I bomb down the hill to make sure, and just as I’d thought: no pain.

No pain? NO PAIN!

Yeeeeee haaaaaaa!

And suddenly I am a different man. It’s 3 o’clock in the afternoon, I’ve been moving my ass for 17 hours straight, suffering all sorts of fatigue, aches and pains, and now, NOW the race begins.

I’m flying!

I am a hawk and there’s blood on my feathers. But time is still turning and soon they’ll be dry. And all those who see me, and all those who believe in me, share in the freedom I feel when I fly.

–The Eagle and the Hawk, John Denver

FLYING!

Blowing by everyone now. Zoom… zoom…. zoom. Feels awesome. But it could end at any moment, so I don’t let myself get cocky.

“Just riding a good wave,” I tell the runners I pass, “gotta take advantage while I can.”

Is this enjoying the pain? Or is this just the Ibuprofen talking?

Probably just the Ibuprofen talking. And the Red Bull screaming. Who cares? You feel good. Enjoy that, for once.

I do. For THREE HOURS.

I soar.

And then I crash.

Of course.

By the time I crash it’s 6 p.m.

Just four more hours! I can do this! This pain ain’t nothin’. This fatigue ain’t a thing.

I hit the 75 mile mark at 5 p.m., so I have to be close to 80 miles now, after all that cranking. With four hours left, knowing I will hit my mileage goal, a smile creeps in, washing my entire body with warm and fuzzy joy.

I'm doing this! (Image courtesy of Hersh Ajgaonkar)

I’m doing this! (Image courtesy of Hersh Ajgaonkar)

Back to the grind: eat, drink and the slow run/walk shuffle.

Hours 21 – 24 (7 p.m. – 10 p.m.)

It’s 7 o’clock and considerably cooler. Edna is here and she’s ready to run. We didn’t plan on having any pacing, because I thought the race was against that. However, lots of folks seem to be using pacers, so why not?

I warn her of my slow pace and bring her up to speed on my run/walk pattern.

“I’ve been running this loop the exact same way, all day long.” I tell her. She smiles, like always, and then remains silent as I gush on about all my aches and pains, my blisters, the sun, my IT band, bla bla bla whaa whaa whaa.

You’re being a Debbie Downer, I tell myself. You should shut up.

And take 200 mg more of Ibuprofen.

And drink your last Red Bull.

I do.

Half an hour later, and the magic is back. Let it fly, baby!

For the next two hours, Edna and I crank! I feel like I’m running really fast again, though I can’t tell if it’s a relative feeling or if I actually am moving fast. Regardless, we are zooming by everyone, including Shan, the race leader, who is still probably 15 laps or so ahead of me.

Still, with this newfound energy I’m also feeling ornery, so every time I gain a lap back on him I say: “I’m comin’ for ya, Shan!”

Me and Edna, cranking with a smile. (Image courtesy of Nate Pualengco)

Me and Edna, cranking with smiles. (Image courtesy of Nate Pualengco)

Around and round and round we go. As long as I’ve been running this loop, I can honestly say I am not sick of it. I actually love it. I love the scenery, the decorations, the familiar signposts.

Hell, right now, I love everyone and every thing and every place. I love you and you… and you! I am just running and running and feeling like a superhuman with an enlightened mind. The hours tick by and I know we’re getting close.

Two hours…

The 10k runners come from the opposite direction, offering more love and support.

One hour…

The Ibuprofen is starting to wear off. I’m coming back down to earth, back to my normal, tired, sluggish, beat up body.

With 35 minutes left, feeling suddenly slow with very little left in the tank, I tell Edna: “We can get two more miles. Two more.”

We plug away.

Edna and I, on the homestretch. (Image courtesy of Nate Pualengco)

Edna and I, on the homestretch. (Image courtesy of Nate Pualengco)

“Enjoy your pain,” I say to her. “That’s what you told me. That’s been with me all day. All day long I’ve been thinking about it. Enjoying it.”

She smiles back while never breaking stride.

“I get it now,” I continue, between labored breaths. “Knowing this… this feeling, this pain, this fatigue…. knowing it so intimately… it makes everything else… the joys, the success… makes it feel so sweet, so much better.”

“I’m proud of you, Jeff,” she says as we make our final turn onto the sidewalk parallel to Short Street. “You can do anything now.”

I can do anything.

I can.

Anything.

“Let’s run it in,” I say as we turn back onto the parking lot and head towards the finish. “Gotta look good for the end.”

I cross the line, completely exhausted, at 23 hours, 51 minutes and 33 seconds, seventh place overall with a total of 94.09 miles in my legs.

Edna and I embrace and I want to cry but I don’t have the energy. Instead we just smile a bunch and hug our friends at the finish.

“Aw, come on, Jeff, you can run a 9 minute mile!” jokes one of those friends, Karen, pointing towards the time left on the clock.

“Not right now I can’t. I. Am. Done.”

Sweeter words may never have been said.

24 hours, 94 miles, 43 mile distance PR. (Image courtesy of Nate Pualengco)

24 hours, 94 miles, 43 mile distance PR, lots of memories. (Image courtesy of Nate Pualengco)

Post Race

The hours shortly after the race gave me a good idea of what it will be like to be 90 years old. On the ride home, I fell asleep mid-conversation, mouth agape, snoring loudly. We made a stop at Jewel, which I don’t remember. I needed Edna’s help to get out of the car, walk in the house, and climb up the stairs. After a hot shower, I got nauseous from the steam. Once I recovered from that, I crawled into bed and shivered uncontrolably for about five minutes before she brought me some soup to warm me up. After an entire day of eating pizza, chips, cookies, oranges, bread, pasta, bacon, pancakes, watermelon, licorice, crackers, grapes, pretzels, peanut butter and jelly, chocolate, hash browns, and much more, soup and ONLY SOUP, sounded pretty good.

I slept like a rock.

The next day?

To be honest, I have felt much worse after running road marathons.

I think I could get used to doing these. Sure it hurt out there — pounding pavement and baking under the sun — but it hurt so good to dig in deep and crawl around inside my head. It hurt so good to feel so alive!

So much so that I’m already thinking about next year’s race…

And ONE HUNDRED miles.


Make It Up As You Go Along and Just Be Happy That You Can

(image courtesy of http://www.voyageur50.com)

(image courtesy of http://www.voyageur50.com)

In racing, in training, in LIFE, sometimes you plan everything out perfectly only to have everything fall apart.  This is something that used to drive me crazy when I was younger dumber.  Not being able to control things and not having my carefully laid plans come to fruition was such a struggle for me and I have the salt and pepper hair to prove it.

Thankfully, I have since given up that fight.  Sure, I’m a work in progress, but I am concentrating on being mindful of my shortcomings — control being one of the biggest — and I’m finding this awareness to be a quick and healthy solution to managing the stress and fear that tends to accompany not being in control.

As Chinua Achebe (and The Roots) once told us: things fall apart.

Get used to it!

And besides, I have found that life is so much more enjoyable when I just let it come to me and experience it in the present tense, right now.  Running certainly taught me that.  Looking at myself and my actions from an outsider’s perspective taught me that too.

So when my big plans to race the Christmas in July 12-hour timed event this July fell through recently (for several reasons, I’m guessing mostly permit related at this point), I let myself be upset for about five seconds before I hopped on the interwebs and started looking for another event to fill the void.

Found it!

The Minnesota Voyageur 50 Mile Trail Ultramarathon.

I’m sure my butt will hurt just the same traversing through lush Minnesota forest as it would running in circles around a municipal park.  So it’s time to keep pushing on with the training towards my goal of scootin’ up and down those power lines!


Dreams Realized, Lessons Learned, Bars Raised

Goodbye, dear 2012, and thanks for the memories.  From a running standpoint, 2012 will go down as the year I upped my game beyond what I ever thought was possible.  And I have the jawbreaking ear-to-ear smile to prove it.

I raced two major marathons and PR’d them both (Houston in January and Chicago in October).  The Chicago race served as my very first Boston Qualifier — a feat that leaves me eternally proud and acutely focused.

In May, I finished my very first 50 mile race at the Ice Age 50 and followed that up in August by logging 50.85 miles during the Howl at the Moon 8 Hour Run.  In the latter race, I also tasted another top ten finish (8th Overall), to go along with those achieved at Clinton Lake (8th Overall) and the Earth Day 50K (1st in Age Division, 4th Overall).

I also ran a few short races, completing my third Chinatown 5K (the race that started it all), while also logging a then PR in the half marathon at Batavia and a respectable time in my first short-distance trail event.

Plus, I got to spend a lot of time with my dear friends from the New Leaf Ultra Runs club, including two unforgettable 100 mile Supergirl pacing experiences (Mohican 100 and Hallucination 100), an inspiring Run Across Illinois and the most liberating impromptu adventure run I have yet to have.

No doubt, 2012 was something to remember.

It was also something to learn from, as the continuous pushing of my body without adequate rest eventually led to an IT band injury and a sincere reevaluation of my training techniques.  But I am happy to report that after 6 weeks off and a highly focused physical therapy regimen, I have begun to run again pain-free and feel confident that I will be able to put forth 100% effort in training for my next major event, the Boston Marathon.

Indeed, a sub-3 hour attempt at Houston in two weeks will not be possible.  However, I was able to transfer my registration down to the half marathon, which I will use as a barometer for my current fitness, the base from which I will begin Boston training in earnest.

And while I do have a couple of 50Ks and perhaps one 50 miler on the schedule for 2013, my main focus will be on the marathon distance and breaking that 3 hour mark.  I am obsessed (in the very best way possible) with seeing my name followed by a 2-something marathon time.  I will do it, by golly.

I will run 26.2 miles in less than 3 hours.

And when I do, I’m having a big party.  You’re all invited.

Peace, love and all the running happiness in the world!


Dissuade Discomfort, Move Your BUTT: The 2012 Howl at the Moon 8 Hour Run Race Report

(Image courtesy of Brian Gaines)

I have run enough marathon+ distance races now to know that aches and pains are simply going to come.  There is no shortcut.  I know this.  I either accept the discomfort and move on or I suffer defeat.  I also know that anything can go wrong, at any time — that a successful race is never a given and the best runners are those who are able to adapt on the fly.

Yet I somehow still seem to underestimate just how uncomfortable I will be at times and how I might possibly struggle to keep up the fight.  In my mind, it’s always a given.  In reality, it is much harder.

In preparation for the Kennekuk Road Runners’ 22nd Annual Howl at the Moon 8 Hour Run, a race that typically features hellaciously high temps and unforgiving humidity, I heat trained in winter gear at high noon and suffered through several long road runs outside of Houston, TX, just so I would be ready for whatever mother nature would throw at me.  I put myself in painful situations and prepared my mind to reinterpret the norm.

Naturally, August 11, 2012 would bring unseasonably cool temperatures (mid-high 50s for low, low 80s for the high) to the Danville area, I would be bothered by an old nemesis that had been dormant since October 2011 and I would realize that one can train and train and train, but that there really is no substitution for the feelings associated with running 50 miles other than running 50 miles.

The Night Before

Me, my sister Cara and my friend Jerret all arrive together at the Kennekuk Cove County Park where we will camp along the course prior to the race.  It turns out that even though I have recently acquired a strong taste for all things outdoors, I am still an idiot when it comes to putting things together, as is evident by my inability to put up our tent.  Luckily, ten or so special aides jump in to make fun of assist me.  These helpers are just some of the 30 or so runners from my New Leaf and M.U.D.D. groups, fellow ultra junkies who know how to have a good time.  It turns out we’re all having such a good time that the tent is thwarting our focus.  Finally, Tony and Alfredo save the day and I can begin my pre-race routine.

I have ONE beer, eat a salad and some pasta, then try to relax as much as I can as the group gathers around to share race stories and good cheer.  Admittedly, it’s hard for me to calm my nerves when there is so much excitement in the air.  I’ve been looking forward to this race for a long time now, mostly because of how many familiar faces I will see on the 3.29 mile looped course and how good I feel knowing that, right now, I am in the best shape I have ever been, my whole life.

My sister and I have already had an EPIC week, so I’m taking those positive vibes, channeling them through my mind with deep belly breaths, and being confident in my training.  I begin to yawn, so I say good night to everyone and retire to the tent.

Race Morning

The air is cool.  Dew all around.  The chill peps me out of my zombie-like state.  Did I sleep last night?  A little, but not much.  Cara’s allergies had her coughing most of the night and my rookie camping ass didn’t bring a soft base layer for the tent, so I rolled around on uneven ground most of the evening.  Still, it’s rare that I get a lot of sleep the night before a race anyway, so I’m not too bothered.  Instead, I go about my normal routine, which includes a liberal application of heavy-duty lubrication (you knew that was coming, right?).

I make sure I proudly display my red short-shorts around the start/finish area so everyone can get their taunting out of their system (I say this in the most endearing of ways, because I know the shorts are insanely short, and are considered a running fashion faux pas by some — that some not including me, obviously).

I check in with my official scorer, Pat, the man who will be recording each of my laps as I pass by throughout the day.  I introduce myself and shake Pat’s hand.  He seems just as excited as I am, so I know he and I are going to have a connection — whether he knows it or not.  “Nice meeting you, Pat.  I will see you soon!” I say as I head back towards the tent.

My mom arrives to help my sister crew the race.  I give Mom a big hug and marvel at the shirt she has on!  Both she and Cara are wearing custom made shirts that read “Jeff’s Crew” on the back.  Wow!  How awesome is that!  I know I am spoiled having a family that is so supportive of my never-ending running adventures.  I don’t take that for granted.  Having them involved by crewing my races, sharing in my ups and downs, serves as a real mental boost.  Makes me feel special.

I go over last minute instructions with them both, but Cara has done this before, so we all feel confident and are ready to go.

7:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

As the race director makes his announcements, I position myself at the front.  My goal for this 8 hour run today is to be in the mix.  Ultimately, I want to run no less than 50 miles, hoping that is enough to get me another top ten finish; but deep down, I want more.  I want to push and see what happens.  That doesn’t mean I am dumb enough to kill myself early on, but I do plan to straddle the line between stupid and daring.

We take a moment of silence to remember Scott Hathaway, a remarkable runner who died on the course five years ago.

And then…

WE’RE OFF!!!

I dart out, being led by the man who has owned this event since 2004, Scott Colford of Logansport, IN.  He has the course record (61.72 miles) and has won it every year he has participated.  I figure he is going to set a pretty quick pace to drop as many of us as he can, and, indeed, he does just that as we settle around 6:30 to 7:00 minute pace out of the gate.

As we hit the first turn onto shaded rocky trail, we all take a moment to touch the memorial set up for Scott Hathaway — a salute to a fellow ultra runner.  We all touch it for good luck.

(Image courtesy of Brian Gaines)

About a mile in and already the lead pack is well separated from the rest.  Colford takes off at a pace I simply can’t match — not this early anyway.  There is a young fellow with him and a slim runner dressed in Marathon Maniac gear chasing close behind, but I settle into my own 7:00-7:30 pace, and focus on memorizing the course.

From my training I learned that one way to beat the monotony of a looped course is to know its every nook and cranny, to know where to accelerate, where to slow down, what tangents to run to shorten it up, to isolate any spots that may offer trouble along the way.  This course is mostly grass and dirt trail, with some occasional pavement.  There’s one tricky spot in the middle that throws a gauntlet of uneven footing highlighted by a couple of ankle traps.  There is one relative downhill section, just after the first aid station at the halfway point, where one can genuinely take advantage of free speed.  And there is one significant uphill section that I decide to run the first few times, but know I will have to walk at some point.

I finish the first loop in a quick 23 minutes.  I run by the tent where my mom and sister are waiting for me (something they will do a lot of all day long!).  I assure them I’m good to go and I zoom on by.

My kick-ass crew! Mom on the left, Cara right. (Image courtesy of Brian Gaines)

I make eye contact with my scorer, Pat, we establish the first of many connections we’ll have throughout the day and now I start to think about what I’m really in for: 7 hours and 37 more minutes of RUNNING!!!

After a couple of steady 25-minute loops, and no change in the three leaders up front, I settle into the chase pack that offers another familiar face, John Kiser from Grayslake.

“I remember you,” I offer to John.  “You blazed by me at the Earth Day 50K with just three miles left.”

“Yeah, I was feeling good that day,” he says with a good-hearted smile.

We carry on, running and chatting here and there with another runner, Gary, who hails from Mokena, IL.  For the next several loops, we ebb and flow, picking up, slowing down, chatting every so often and trying to catch up to one another just as much.  I feel especially confident on the down and uphill sections, so I tend to drop them there only to have them catch up to me soon after.  In fact, I crown Gary as “The Accelerator”, because no matter how big a gap I put between us on the hills, he seems to have no problem closing it with his speed.

Back and forth we go… back and forth for one loop, two loops, three loops.  Back and forth.  Back and forth.   UGH!  The more we exchange positions, the more irritated I become.  I can’t seem to drop him.  My mind is losing focus!  But before I can battle any of my thoughts, another obstacle is kicking me in the butt.  Literally.

And I’ve nowhere to hide.

Piriformis syndrome.  A real pain in the ass.  Deep down inside the gluteus maximus.  A condition I have been dealing with off and on for a few years now, it is most positively rooted in the fact that my day job has me sitting for eight hours a day.  It probably doesn’t help that, when I’m not running or working, I am usually writing, from a sitting position.  The only way to beat it is to apply great pressure to the piriformis itself — a muscle that excels at being elusive to even the deepest of deep tissue massages, or settle for a series of elaborate stretches that help elongate it.

Unfortunately, none of those remedies are very applicable during a race.  It flared up on me during the 2011 Chicago Marathon, but I was able to run it off after 20 minutes or so.  That isn’t happening today.  I’ve been redirecting my attention from the aches for almost an hour now but as I finish up my 7th loop, this time in 27 minutes, I slow down considerably as I approach my crew.  I bark orders at my sister, then immediately feel guilty for letting my frustrations dictate my voice.

“Sorry,” I offer.  “I’m just not feeling so great right now.” I try to explain.

Supergirl (yes, THAT Supergirl) is there with my mom and sister now, and she offers to help, but I know there is nothing that can be done for this royal pain in the butt, so I just grab some grapes and a new bottle and head off knowing I’m going to have to slow it down.

I think I was sorta short with Supergirl just now, too.  What is wrong with me?

In fact, my mom’s notes from the race at this point read “Shitty”, and well, yeah.  That’s about how I feel right now.

10:00 a.m. to 1 p.m.

FUUUUUUUUUUUUUU —

I want to scream.  But I can’t.  I can’t be a baby now.  I just gotta suck it up.  Or… drop.

That’s right.  I could drop.  I could just stop now and say I gave it my all.

But… am I giving it my all?

No.  Yes, my butt hurts.  Can I still move forward without causing any further damage?  Yes.  It’s just a butt-ache!  It will go away!

But…

There goes Gary, flying by me.  For the last time.  I can’t keep up.

Damn it!  I should just DNF.  Who cares?!?  It’s stupid if I’m not having fun!

Why aren’t you having fun?  That’s no one’s fault but yours… mine.  Suck it up, Jeff!  This shit isn’t easy.  It’s supposed to be tough!

Of course, it is.  Just keep moving.

John flies by me.  A few minutes later two guys I passed earlier in the race whiz by me.  A few minutes later, another.  I’m fading.

So what?  Be glad you’re moving, dummy.  Be glad you’re alive, running around this park with your mom and sister waiting on your every need, a friendly face around every bend.  Wake up!!!

There’s Alfredo up ahead.  Let’s go catch him and see how he’s doing.

“Jeff!” he says, excited to see me.  “How are you doing?”

I want to tell him about my issues, about how I was in 4th and now I’m in… I have no idea where I am now and that my butt hurts and that it’s hot now and I want to be sitting down with something cold in my hand and I am feeling sorry for myself and I am thinking about dropping and THEN…

“I’m doing okay,” I say.

We run along together for a short bit and he spontaneously tells me that I inspire him.  He tells me that he uses me to push himself to be better — this coming from a man who went from being a 250+ pound alcoholic to a sober, slim running beam of light!  Wow.

I really am being stupid.

“Thanks, Alfredo.  You inspire me too.”

In fact, he’s inspiring me RIGHT NOW.

I dart off, fully aware of the lingering pain in my butt, but accepting (finally) the fact that mulling about it in my own head isn’t going to help me run any faster.  I’m going to run this next little bit for Alfredo.

Then I catch up to another friend, Art.  I’m going to run this little bit for Art.

And there’s Jeremy.  I’m gonna run this little bit for Jeremy.

And Eric.  And Kelly.  And Tony.  AND MY LORD I COULD RUN THE WHOLE REST OF THIS RACE ON THE ENERGY OF ALL MY FRIENDS!!!

I may be slowing down considerably as I roll past my crew and check in with Pat for my 10th, 11th and 12th loops, but I see I’ve logged 39.48 miles with two hours to go and suddenly I am ready to MOVE AGAIN!

Ultrarunning Rule #1: Always smile. Even if it hurts. (Image courtesy of Brian Gaines)

1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Pain in the ass?  WHAT pain in the ass?  Move along, son! 

Okay, so it’s not the most conventional of running mantras, but it’ll work.  Especially now, since this is a race against the clock!  I have two hours to run 10 miles, something that I could normally do with my eyes closed and feet shackled.  Of course, it’s a bit harder with 40 miles already in the legs, but I get another boost of inspiration from my friend, Whitney Richman, who sneaks up on me as I start running out of the start/finish area aid station.

I am officially getting “chicked”.

So what?  It’s Whitney!  Whitney is a badass.

She is currently running in the first female position.  I respect her speed as much as her toughness.

“You started running again just as I pass you,” she says jokingly.

“It’s all good, Whitney.  You’re going to pass me.  And you’re going to win!  Great job!”

Getting “chicked” (passed by a female competitor) can be a big stain on the psyche of many males.  I used to think it was just out of jest, but apparently some dudes do take it very seriously.  I am not one of those dudes.  I started off in road running, where I was getting beat by fit, fast and elite women quite regularly.  What the hell do I care if a girl passes me?  She must be fast if she’s blowing by me so more power to her!

All I care about now is getting my 5o miles in.

And I’m gettin’ it now.  In fact, I even have a little bounce in my step.  I keep a decent 9:00-9:30 pace at this point and just concentrate on moving forward.  For a little while I run with another Kennekuk regular named Scott who tells me this is his 20th year running Howl.  20 YEARS!  WOW!  Eventually he runs on past me but I definitely appreciate the conversation while it lasted.

*Running with Siamak (Image courtesy of Brian Gaines)

My pal Siamak catches up to me and we run together for a while.  Hmm, been in this situation before, I thought.  I could get used to this!  It really is comforting to have a familiar face join you in your most primordial pits of pain, if only to distract the mind and body from feeling so crappy.

We eventually separate, and once again, I concentrate on catching up to the next friend, and then the next.

I finish my 13th loop in 33 minutes, a whole five minutes faster than the 12th loop as my mother quickly points out.

“Why do I do this stuff again, Mom?”

“Because you’re going to feel really good once you’re done.”

“Exactly.”  I knew the answer.  Deep down I know that.  But sometimes, in the middle of it all, it’s easy to forget.  It’s nice to be reminded by someone who has your best interests at heart.

“I’m getting my 50 miles.” I declare.

The 14th loop is a blur.  Really.  To keep my mind from doing annoyingly instantaneous calculations that never seem to accumulate fast enough, I force myself to look down at the ground in front of me, so when I eventually do look up and see that I’m done with the loop, it doesn’t seem like it took that long.

“I got you down for 14 loops, headed out for your 15th, Jeff.” says Pat.

“Thank you, Pat!”

I like Pat.  I really like that guy.  Something about the way he says my name every time and looks me straight in the eye and raises his hand so I know he is talking to me… I don’t know him, but I think I know that he’s an awesome dude and he probably has a whole circle of friends and family who would back that up.

This last loop is for Pat.

I get to the bottom of the great big hill.  I power hike my way up and thank the aid station volunteers at the top.  Nearly ever time I crested that big old thing I immediately craved ice cold water.  And there, every time at my service, were the kind souls at the top of that hill with just that very thing to ease my pain.  This last swig of water is for you, awesome aid station workers!

Up ahead of me is Jerret.  We’re runnin’ this in together.

Jerret and I, finishing strong. (Image courtesy of Brian Gaines)

I finish the 15th loop alongside Jerret.  We have 20 minutes left, but since we don’t have enough time to make another full 3.29 mile loop, we now have to hit the quarter mile out-and-backs as many times as we can before the eight hours are finally up.  I need just two out-and-backs to make 50 miles.

I run three and finish with 50.85 miles.

Whew.

Post-Race

My mom and Cara are there to hold me up, because now that the race is over, I don’t feel like using my legs much at all.  I lean on them both as we make our way back to the tent so I can begin the healing process.

As usual, tears start to fall out of my face like a big old softy.

“Why does this always happen to me, Mom?” I ask.

She says something about serotonin overdrive or something like that and I realize it doesn’t much matter.  These are tears of joy.  I fought the fight today and I won, because I’m still standing.

I didn’t give up.  And in the end I won my age group, finishing 8th overall.

The New Leaf/M.U.D.D. crew showing off the hardware. (Image courtesy of Brian Gaines)

- – -

Everything else was just gravy.  The folks who put on this race are awesome people!  As the RD repeatedly said, they love to party.  We ate, we drank, we hung around for a kick-ass awards ceremony where our New Leaf and M.U.D.D. groups took home some major bling.  We hung out and just relaxed knowing that we all did something special out there while most of America was probably busy sitting down, watching awful reality TV, eating something engineered in a chemistry lab.

Congratulations to Whitney Richman who won the women’s race, coming in 6th overall!  And, of course, a tip of the cap to Scott Colford, the winner and STILL champion of  Howl.

I’ll be baaaaaaack…

(Image courtesy of Brian Gaines)

Also, thanks, Brian for all these fantastic pictures!


Loopty Loop!

One of my sick fantasies is to run a 24-hour timed race… on a 400 meter track.

When I met Scott Jurek this past October, I was in complete awe of his description of the latter hours of a short looped 24-hour ultra, of how the mind is forced to go to unexplored places, and how self-discovery can be dug up from the deepest and darkest of holes.

The short looped course offers a different dimension of running than most conventional courses at long distance events.  It’s not the scenic kind of race.  It’s not the one you go out and enjoy with a buddy either.  Instead, it’s the put-your-head-down-and-zen-out-til-you-know-what-it-means-to-BE-ALIVE kind of event.  And I want as many of those as I can get.

Sometimes, to add variety to my training, I will do short loop long distance training runs to find that zone where my body and my mind become one powerfully synced moving machine.  A 20-miler on a half mile loop around my house.  3 hours on the 400 meter dirt track at Palmisano Park.  The same 3 mile out-and-back until I hit whatever number I want on that day.

The trick, for me, is to do these spontaneously, with gentle, easy effort.  The idea is to just float along on the same invisible line, hitting every step exactly the same each time.  When I’m really feeling it, I am able to hit near exact splits on every single loop, without even thinking about it.

That is some powerful mind-body connection right there.  And I love experiencing it.  But if I do it too much then it loses its allure, so I like to think of them as prized, perfect storm opportunities.

I always seem to know when it’s time for one of these.  It’s like my body craves it.  Like a drug.

Scott Jurek and I at the Chicago Marathon Expo, October 8, 2011


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