Running up, over and through the cogs

Slushy, Slick and Slow: The 2014 Frozen Gnome 50k Race Report

Jeff Lung 2014 Frozen Gnome 50k Butt Slide Hill

   (Having a blast down “Butt Slide Hill”; Photo by Scott Laudick, http://runnerpics.smugmug.com/)

Just get to Butt Slide Hill, just get to Butt Slide Hill, just get to Butt Slide Hill…

No me dejes nunca, nunca, nunca… te lo PIIIIIIIIIIIDO por favor…

Soup, soup, soup… hot… soup, soup, soup…

No doubt the above is an odd collection of unrelated thoughts turned mantras. But these, along with some choice others, were the phrases that kept me moving throughout my 7 hour 9 minute journey through frosty McHenry County wonderland at the 2014 Frozen Gnome 50k. This is my story:

Saturday, January 11, 2014
Pre-Race
5:00 a.m.

*BEEP BEEP BEEP*

Boom. I’m awake. I can smell the coffee brewing.

I jump to my feet and shove a couple of bananas and a Clif Bar down my throat while I check the weather. A night of freezing rain descended on the Veterans Acres course and the high for today looks like it will crest above 40. This is good news, or this is bad news.

So far this winter, over 30 inches of snow have accumulated in the Chicagoland area and with the Polar Vortex treating us to negative high temperatures just a few days ago, I’m feeling quite joyous about not having to risk hypothermia and frostbite during this race. However, above freezing temps and lots of rain will likely make the already challenging, hilly course a roller coaster of slushy, slick and slow surprises.

Good.

I love surprises.

7:30 a.m.

My girlfriend and I arrive at Veteran Acres in Crystal Lake, IL and we both take note of the pleasant, warm air. But as soon as we try to navigate the parking lot turned ice rink, we immediately connect on what kind of adventure is in store for us today.

“We’re going to have to take it easy,” I say, “we’ll be just one spill away from six weeks in a walking boot.”

We pick up our bib numbers and greet the swarms of friendly faces near the start line. This event, hosted by our dear friends from the McHenry County Ultrarunning Dudes and Dudettes (M.U.D.D.) group, has attracted runners from all over the Chicago area. And like other ultra races held around here, the sense of love, joy and community is in high definition surround sound.

I greet race director Michele Hartwig and course director, Geoff Moffat, both with a hearty hug followed by a questioning grin.

“I think we’re in for quite a test today,” I say.

Geoff’s sinister chuckle validates my thought.

The 10k’ers go off, hopefully packing down the snow-slush trail for us on the way.

15 minutes later and…

We’re off!!!

Loop 1, Miles 1 – 6.2

My game plan for today is to go out nice and easy, survey the course the first time around and adjust my effort accordingly. I’m in Boston training mode, so everything I do right now is in preparation for that. Today I expect to get some gnarly hill and mental toughness training; and I would like to keep my heart rate around 150 bpm, so I’ll be keeping a close watch.

The course is a 10k loop, repeated 5 times, so I should know it (possibly love it, or hate it) very well by the end.

The initial findings in my constant mind-body-mind feedback loop are: oh boy, this is a toughie, what have I gotten myself into?

The snow is packed down in spots, not so much in others. The ongoing thaw has created a perpetually messy slush-soup in some parts and when we hit the occasional paved paths it’s nothing short of an ice rink. Oh, and then there are the hills — steep climbs that force me to dig in hard with the fat lugs on my Salomon Speedcross 3s on the way up and cautiously pick away through an admittedly odd looking dance on the way down.

I prepare my mind for the impending hip flexor hurt and subsequent butt soreness.

Traffic on the trail is moving pretty well. I am in a group of steady movers who, like me, seem to be striving to go home in one piece. Everything is going swell until suddenly, at the crest of a long climb, we stop. Completely.

“What’s going on?” I ask to those up ahead.

“Butt Slide Hill,” I hear someone holler back.

I poke my head out from the congested conga line to see a group of runners stopped in their slushy tracks, unsure of how to navigate down the frighteningly steep descent. Their facial expressions say they aren’t sure, so I cut the line and head straight to the front.

“It’s not called ‘Butt Slide Hill’ for nothin’,” I say as I scoot to my backside and slide — WEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!! — all the way down.

Wow. That. Was. AWESOME.

I rise to my feet, and despite the snow filling my crack, I can’t stop from laughing.

“That was worth the price of registration alone,” I say to a runner close behind. “And to think, we get to do that four more times!!!”

A couple of miles later and my smile finally starts to wane as the thick slush soaking and freezing my feet reminds me that I have a lot of work to do, and a long way to go.

But I reach the start/finish line to a raucous cheer from a familiar cast of friends and volunteers. I fill my bottle, grab some grub and head back out for more punishment.

Loop 2, Miles 6.2 – 12.4

I walk fast while chomping down on some delicious cookies and notice my heart rate hovering around 140, even while walking. So far I have been successful in keeping my heart rate in the 150 range while running. I only wish it would drop a bit more when going slow. When I tackle any hill it seems to soar around 160-170.

I contemplate this, as well as the recipe to these scrumptious cookies, when suddenly I hear “What the–?” from behind. I turn back to see Jeff Moss, a friendly runner (with an awesome name) whom I met at the 2013 DPRT 50. He seems surprised to have caught me so early in the race.

“Oh no, it’s going to be slow-going for me today,” I assure him. “I want to go home in one piece.”

For the entirety of this loop, Jeff and I run together, sometimes talking, sometimes not, but always moving. We chat about races past and those to come. I am impressed with Jeff’s running resume, especially that he’s going to take on his first 100 miler this spring at the Potawatami 100.

“You definitely have the bug, don’t you? The racing bug.” I say.

“Oh yes, definitely.”

As we climb up towards the peak of Butt Slide Hill for the second time, I look back to see I’m first in a long line of runners. Eager to lead by good example, I excitedly drop down on my butt and — WEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!! — zoom down the hill.

I stop at the bottom, but again, I can’t stop laughing. I feel like a goofy kid drunk off life.

A couple miles of more slogging and we’re back at the start/finish line. This time there are cinnamon rolls! YES!

Loop 3, Miles 12.4 – 18.6

I start back out on my own, but it doesn’t take long for Jeff to catch up to me again. I welcome the company, even when the trail forces us to concentrate hard on staying upright, leading to limited conversation. It’s just nice to know that if I fall and snap my femur, someone will be there to help me up.

The loop is getting to be familiar now. Up this hill, down that one. Around this snow bank, zig-zagging over that one. Ankle high sloppy slush through this multi-track, cross country skiing with trail shoes through that one.

Every once in a while we are greeted by smiling course marshals and a ringing cow bell. It’s all becoming as familiar to me now as the rising ache in my butt.

“I’m getting beat up,” Jeff says.

“Me too. Me. Too.”

We reach the start/finish line and I head right for my drop bag and a much needed Red Bull. Friend and volunteer Julie Bane offers me some hot soup and I take it as fast as I can.

Ahhhhh… yes. It warms my soul as much as my gut.

“Wow, this soup is delicious, Julie,” I say. “It doesn’t necessarily pair well with the Red Bull, but man, did I need that!”

As I stand around my drop bag slurping soup and Red Bull, I contemplate a sock and shoe change. After 18+ miles of stomping through snow and slush, my feet are frozen bricks, and the more I stand around, the colder they get. It might be nice to have dry feet, I think to myself, but as soon as I get back on the trail they will go right back to being cold and soaking wet.

I’m better off just dealing with it.

So I do.

Loop 4, Miles 18.6 – 24.8

Jeff passes me as we head out for this loop and his backside quickly disappears from my view. That’s the last time I will see him until the finish line.

“Go get ’em, Jeff!” I yell, mostly to myself, because he is too far away to hear.

I put my head down, pump my arms and force myself to just… keep… moving.

My heart rate is hovering around 155-160 now and it’s getting harder and harder to bring it down. Each hill I climb sends it to 170 and beyond, and even when I slow to a fast hike I find it difficult to get below 150. I guess this is because THIS RACE IS HARD.

WOW!

Up the hills, down the hills, up the hills, down the hills.

It’s a hard course, but beautiful, no doubt. I am all alone on this loop and the surrounding forest keeps me entertained with its eery quiet and comforting, wintery surprises.

I hit Butt Slide Hill again, chuckling all the way down, and when I find myself back at the start/finish line, volunteer extraordinaire Karen Shearer greets me with a beaming smile and more hot soup.

I really don’t want to leave the comforts of the start/finish area. My feet are bricks. My hip flexors are screaming. My butt aches. Heck, it’s taken me five and a half hours to complete 40k, cementing the idea that this will be my slowest 50k finish ever, in the seven hour plus range. But race director Michele said she brought my favorite post-race grub, her famous taco soup, and I would feel guilty filling up on that treasure without having finished the race, so I put on my big-boy smile and get the hell back out there.

Loop 5, Miles 24.8 – 31

The biggest difference between this loop and the previous four is the fact that I’m doing a LOT of walking now, even on the flats. Also, I’m singing. To be specific, I’m singing “Te Lo Pido, Por Favor”, a song that has been stuck in my head for a couple of weeks now. Since I’m all alone and suffering, I’m even singing three different versions (Juan Gabriel, Banda El Recodo and my favorite, Marc Anthony) at the top of my lungs.

Tu me sabes bien guiar, tu me sabes bien cuidar…

Oh man, my butt hurts.

Good grief my feet are cold. I could use some taco soup right about now. Yes, soup… hot soup, soup, soup…

Whew. Wow. I’m gonna suggest to the course director THAT HE MAKE THIS RACE A LITTLE TOUGHER NEXT TIME.

Just get to Butt Slide Hill, just get to Butt Slide Hill, just get to Butt Slide Hill…

I get to Butt Slide Hill and now I know, yes, it’s… all downhill from here. WEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!

At the bottom of the hill, resting on my back, I just smile. And laugh. Sure I’m sore. Sure I ache. Sure my feet are frigidly cold.

But is there anything else you’d rather be doing today?

Hell. No.

And with that, I’m up running again. I’m running slow, using an exaggerated arm pump to convince myself I’m running faster than I really am, but I am running.

Hot soup, soup, soup.

Te lo pido, por favor.

As I reach the finish line to cheering voices, my eyes grow large with with the type of joy only arduous adventure can provide. Somehow the sun, an entity that has laid dormant throughout the entire day, comes out to shine, as if to say:

“Welcome to the finish line, Jeff. Now get yer ass some taco soup.”

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4 responses

  1. Dan

    Dude, that picture is timeless. In one single shot that photographer captured a lot of what it means to be you — having fun in the harsh elements, doing whatever it takes to get through the course. But the write-up is just as good. Who would have thought that in the flat-flat Midwest there’d be a grueling course that would earn your respect?

    I have yet to run a course that is more than two loops, so I wonder how my mind would deal with a 5-loop course (or worse, a 1-mile loop over 6, 12 or 24 hours). If I were ever to do something like that, I think a 10k (or a 5k) loop would be ideal. Glad to see you had such a good time and that you earned that taco soup. Great start to the year!

    January 21, 2014 at 09:22

  2. Thanks, Dan! And yes, I agree, that picture says it all.

    January 23, 2014 at 11:50

  3. Pingback: 2014: Slllllllowin’ My Roll, Runnin’ In Circles, Commitment | TheRunFactory.com

  4. Pingback: 2014: Slowin’ My Roll, Runnin’ In Circles, Commitment | TheRunFactory.com

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