Running up, over and through the cogs

Golden Hour Dreams (or Nightmares): The 2017 Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run Race Report

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A LONG TIME AGO…

Before I had even run a full marathon, I was a bona fide Western States aficionado. It was the summer of 2010, and having drastically changed my life (and appearance) by quitting smoking, exercising and eating right, I was training for my first half-marathon. On a run one day my mind got to thinking…

13.1 miles seems like a lot… but 26.2 miles seems like a lot more. I wonder if anyone has ever run more than a marathon. Nah… that’s crazy. No one could do that. Right?

I didn’t know. So I did what I often do in times of uncertainty: I summoned the Google oracle.

“Does anyone run more than a marathon?” I typed.

“ULTRAMARATHON MAN by DEAN KARNAZES” was the result: a book on running crazy distances just because.

BOOM. I bought it.

A few days later, I read it.

And I fell in love. I fell in love with the idea of running and running and running just to see what I might be made of. Dean went into great detail about an insane-sounding race in the Sierra Nevadas called the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run. It championed self-discovery through physicality. It was described as a relentless test of the human spirit — an unprecedented ceremony of lunacy were participants run 100 miles up and over mountains and through valleys while suffering temperatures ranging from 20-110 degrees Fahrenheit.

Some day… I am going to do THAT, I thought to myself.

I had no idea. It sounds silly now, mostly because I had very little experience distance running outside of the few months I had dedicated to training for a half marathon. But at the time I was desperately searching for meaning in my life. I didn’t know who I was or who I was becoming, but in reading Dean’s book I came away with the idea that the deep pains in my heart might find release if only I could somehow find a way to push past physical pain and let my feet discover worlds on their own, without limits.

FAST FORWARD TO DECEMBER 2016

Six years later and now a cagey veteran of countless ultra events (from 50ks to 50 milers to 100 milers), all of that time and dedication wandering in the woods with missing toenails finally paid off. After four years of trying with no success, the Western States running gods chose MY name out of the lottery and suddenly I am going to the big dance.

BOO YA!

BUT WHAT IS THE WESTERN STATES 100-MILE ENDURANCE RUN?

For those who aren’t ultra nerds, think of Western States as the Super Bowl of ultrarunning — the Cadillac of 100-mile running events. It’s Christmas morning for distance junkees. Steak and lobster for gluttons for punishment.

It’s also every expensive — not just the entry fee, but also the transportation, the lodging, the rental car, the crew accommodations, the supplies, the gear the food the blah blah blaaaaaaaahhhhhhh… I knew that if I got in I’d have to run it, conquer it and be satisfied that it would most likely be my one and only shot in this life.

Serious shit.

Back in 2013, I was lucky enough to be the pacer for a good friend of mine, Siamak Mostoufi in his mission to complete the Western States 100. I had a front row seat to magic that only kindled the fire of my dreams. Thereafter I patiently qualified, year after year, until I could finally get my opportunity at doing what most ultrarunners dream of doing.

When they called my name in the December 2016 lottery I told my wife, “We’re in!”

And we were in. No turning back.

THE CREW

In 100-mile races, it is quite common to have “crews”. A crew is an individual or group of individuals who help the runner (AHEM — crazy person) during the race by offering specific aid at various checkpoints throughout. Each runner/crew is unique, so their responsibilities may vary, but usually they center around providing food, drink, gear, clothing and moral support. Oftentimes a pacer is designated — someone who runs along with the runner through the second half of the race for safety reasons, pushing the runner to do his/her best when it might otherwise seem impossible.

I had a crew for my first 100-mile race, the Pinhoti 100 back in 2014. It was my dad (Mike); my buddy, Siamak; and my then-girlfriend now-wife, Edna.

For a trip as epic as the 2017 Western States, I had to get the band back together again. So we did!

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BAM. Good lookin’ group.

For this race their duties are:

Siamak – Crew Chief/Navigator
Dad – Driver/Head Cheerleader
Edna – Pacer/Love-of-my-life

Damn, I am in good hands.

JANUARY 1 2017 TO JUNE 23 2017

Life. Oh man, life.

Good things. Bad things. In-the-middle things.

Unpredictability. Yep, that’s about right.

Training? Yes, TRAINING!

I am a personal trainer and group fitness instructor, so I always stay in shape. I run. I box. I run short races. I spar. I run long races. I fight.

I lead aerobics classes. I hold focus mitts. I jump up and down in homage to Richard Simmons and I try to get folks excited about being healthy.

It’s good all-around training.

But it ain’t no mountains, man.

Western States is tough for a number of reasons, but it’s super tough for flatlanders like me because specificity training is impossible outside of traveling to a mountain somewhere — something that definitely isn’t in my budget.

Luckily my brain already knows what it’s like to suffer through 100 miles on foot. Did it at Pinhoti (2014), Hallucination (2015) and Mohican (2016).

In this sport, the brain trumps all.

RACE DAY – JUNE 24, 2017 – 5 A.M.

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Six months of preparation, positivism, nerves, nightmares, doubt, determination and DREAMS now come down to this: me against the Sierra Nevada, me against the canyons, me against the clock.

In our meetings last night and leading up to this I have been adamant to my crew that my only goal is to finish this race under the 30-hour time limit. I don’t care if I’m dead-fucking-last, just let me finish before they stop the clock.

This game plan seems particularly appropriate considering the conditions this year. Record snowfall in Squaw Valley has left a blanket of white on the first 15 miles of the course, something that will be difficult to navigate while either climbing or descending. Then, once we get past the high country, we will be in for heat in the mid to high 90s.

Yay.

3… 2… 1…

WE’RE OFF!

I’m doing this… I’m running Western States… I’M REALLY RUNNING WESTERN STATES!!!!

And now I’m walking Western States.

The race starts out with a few seconds of flat… followed by four miles and 2100 feet of  straight up climbing. I am walking this.

And I’m walking… and walking.

Walking!

I pay little attention to the fact I am at the very back — that there’s only 7 or 8 people behind me… out of 369!

Man, come on, grandpa! You gonna go this slow the whole way? I ask myself.

Taketh what the course giveth, man.

I’m working hard just to keep this steady uphill pace. I can’t concern myself with what everyone else is doing. If I’m slow, I’m slow. It’s going to be a long day no matter what. Better to not burn out before I’ve even gotten started.

So on I labor.

It’s not long before we’re in snow. Going up. Slipping. Sliding. Climbing. Struggling.

At the top of the escarpment I take in the view, then start to navigate down. Slipping. Sliding. Struggling.

I’m mostly going downhill now, but there’s little to no running happening. Every time I try to jog down I end up on my ass. My hands are already scratched and numb from multiple falls on the crunchy snow and now I’m just trying to stay on my feet.

It’s early, but already I can feel the stress and strain in my legs.

Staying upright is tough, man!

Time is not my friend right now. I look down at my watch and know I am in trouble. ALREADY! It’s been three hours and I still haven’t made it to the first aid station.

Don’t panic. Not yet. Just keep your ass moving.

Slipping, sliding, struggling.

3 hours and 8 minutes after the gun went off, I finally arrive at Lyon Ridge, mile 10.3.

Get that? 10.3. It took me 3 hours and 8 minutes to go just 10.3 miles! I’ve run marathons faster than that! What the hell!?!?

And oh look, the cutoff of for this aid station is 10:00 a.m. The average time for a 30-hour runner to reach this station is 7:40 a.m., putting me 30 minutes behind right off the bat. I ain’t got no time to stay here. RUN, FOREST, RUN!

I fill my bottles and go. SCARED.

Running scared, running scared, running scared.

A few ups, a few downs, a few face plants, and now… MUD. Why not?

What the hell… mud… and muck and snow and mud. I keep moving the best I can. There aren’t many people behind me. I’m at the back. Every time I look behind, I see panic on peoples’ faces. Gotta stop doing that. Gotta stop doing that myself.

DON’T PANIC. NOT YET.

Okay, one foot in front of the other and we’ll get through this.

I think.

I reach a mud bog — the sort of thing that ate Artax in The Neverending Story and makes me cry every time I see it. Still.

Left foot goes in. Right foot goes in. Left foot comes out. Right foot comes out… but without a shoe.

FUUUUUUUUUCCCK.

Right foot goes back in, shoeless… and now I’m digging through the mud elbow deep looking for my shoe.

I find it, pull it out and shun the Western States gods because now it is chock full of mud and a bazillion tiny rocks, same as my shoeless foot.

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P-A-N-I-C.

How am I going to go on now?

I slip the shoe back on and feel every single stone. I hobble over to a large rock, sit my already-tired ass down and assess the situation:

Okay, my right foot and shoe are caked in mud/rocks/grit/evil. I have water. I have water in my bottle. Yes…

I rinse my foot and sock off with the water, getting rid of most of the adhered stones. I rinse out my shoe the same way, taking the insole out and squirting it down with everything I have. I get as many of the rocks out as I can, slide the insole back in, shove the shoe on my foot and GET MY ASS BACK ON THE TRAIL.

Now I’m really behind the clock.

Gotta go! Wish I could! This shit is hard!

I get to an aid station but blow through it not knowing where I am. I go a ways and get to another one. Is this the second? Or third? Where am I? The only thing I saw going through was the cut-off time I’m just barely ahead of it so move, move, move!

I’m running scared. Keep moving. I try to eat but can’t. That’s not good. Usually I can eat anything in an ultra. Right now the thought makes me nauseous. I suck down some gels I’m carrying. I can drink, so I do that.

I traipse down a long descent and finally reach the bottom. It feels different here though. I start my way up, up and up… and now… now I know what’s different: IT’S FRIGGIN’ HOT, MAN.

I climb. And climb. And CLIMB. I’m getting tired. I’ve BEEN tired.

Minutes go by. Lots of them. I forget where I am. Am I at mile 20? 25? I’m all alone. No one around me. It’s just me and this heat and this trail and these trees and I’m hot and my heart rate is soaring and I feel like I’m gonna be sick.

I stop.

Throw up, man. You’ll feel better, I tell myself. But I can’t.

Some deep, steady breaths calm me some, but I’m struggling. Gotta keep moving. I do the best I can.

But now my mind wanders…

I’m not gonna make it. It’s almost 2 o’clock and I haven’t even made it to Duncan Canyon yet… right? Wait, where am I? Am I close to Robinson Flat or do I still have a ways to go? I’m confused. And tired. And sore. ALREADY.

This is too much for me. What am I going to say to my crew? To my students back home? To my wife?

And here I am: STILL climbing. Good grief. This is so dumb.

“Mi amor!!” I hear.

“Mi amor?!?” I yell back, delirious. “Mi amor, is that you?”

“Sí, Papi! Good job! Te amo, mi amor!”

It’s Edna! My wife! My beautiful Mexican wife!

If she is here then… that means I must be at… Robinson Flat! Mile 30! And it’s 1:35 p.m. so I’m not out of the race yet! I’m alive!

Good grief, I’m aliiiiiiiiiiiiiive!!

“Mi amor,” I say cresting the climb, falling into her arms… “Estoy jodido… I’m suffering. I don’t know… I’m just…”

She stops me: “What do you need? You want food? Ice?”

“Ice, yes. Food… I can’t eat. I need gels. Please. And Coke. I can drink Coke.”

She kisses me then runs off ahead to where Dad and Siamak are waiting with supplies. I can’t help but smile thinking I really won the wife lottery by getting her. I love her, man. I really do.

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I stumble into the aid station and get can of Coke. They top off my bottles with ice water and as I move forward I see Dad and Siamak with my buff full of ice, ready to go.

“I’m messed up, man,” I tell Siamak delirious. “The climbing. It’s a lot. I’m shot. My feet. I can’t eat. Just fruit and water and soda really.”

19437262_10155312003217778_5405249679290971051_n“You just got out of a tough climb to get here,” he replies.

“If somehow I survive this, I mean, looking at the time, if I can keep in the race, I don’t think I’ll make it to Michigan Bluff before 8:30 p.m. See if Edna can be ready to pace by then. I will need her.”

“I got you, man. Don’t worry.” he says.

“The next part is going to be easier, mi amor,” says my wife running back towards me.

“Really?” I perk up, chugging Coke. *BELCH*

“Yeah, a little climb then some downhill to the next station,” says Siamak. “It’s going to get hotter and hotter so stay wet. Keep this buff full of ice from here on out.”

I say goodbye. It’s 1:40 p.m. and I don’t have much time. Twenty minutes before they close this station. FUUUUUCK.

Gotta move. Gotta move.

“You can do it, mi amor. You are strong. I know you can.” She stays with me for a bit, shoves gels in my pack and kisses me goodbye.

If she thinks I can do it, damnit, maybe I CAN do it. Let’s go!

*BELCH*

What happens next is pretty wild:

I… AM… RUNNING!!!

Iced down… re-fueled… having seen my wife… I am a new man. And I start to pick up the pace, running hard on the downs, power-hiking like a champ on the ups and pumping my arms hard so my legs will follow on the rare flat.

Miller’s Defeat (mile 34.4), Dusty Corners (mile 38), Last Chance (mile 43.3). I’m rocking it now. How? Ice, maybe. Drinking Coke and eating *BELCH* watermelon? I don’t know. My wife said I could do it so I better prove her right.

I leave Last Chance and cascade down to the bottom of the hot canyon knowing that the hardest climb of the day is coming up. There’s a creek at the bottom of the descent, and when I get there it looks like Hot Tub Time Machine because there’s four people sitting in it, including me. Unlike a hot tub, this water is COLD and REFRESHING and JUST WHAT I NEED before attempting the long, arduous climb up Devil’s Thumb.

The water brings my core temperature down and numbs my beaten feet. I take off up the climb, keeping my head down, trying not to count any of the 36 switchbacks that make up Devil’s Thumb.

It’s slow. But steady. I just power through. Every once in a while I feel sick so I stop and breathe. And then get going again. It’s a bitch. But at least I’m getting through it.

Forever and a day later, I finally reach the top… and what do I find? CARNAGE.

Lots of folks here in chairs, beaten, puking, demoralized.

Not me. Can’t stay here. Gotta go. I got a date with my wife at Michigan Bluff and I gotta get there NOW.

I slam some Coke, eat some fruit and get on my way.

Down, down, down to El Dorado Creek (mile 52.9) only to go back up, up, up towards Michigan Bluff (mile 55.7).

As I get close, I hear people talking on the ridge above me and I know I’m almost to Edna so I just pump my arms like a champ to make myself move that much quicker. I take a quick assessment and know that if I have time I should try to change my socks here. Both my feet are on fire with blister hot spots and I fear the worst.

And then…

“MI AMOR!”

It’s Edna! And she’s ready to run! Yes!

“Mi amor! I’m so happy to see you!” I say.

“You did good, mi amor, going faster. You made good time. What do you need?”

“I need to change my socks and I need Ensure. I can’t eat anything but fruit and soda without feeling sick.”

“Okay, I will get it ready, then we will run together! Te amo, mi amor!”

Edna runs ahead and I see it’s 8:35 p.m. I’m 15 minutes ahead of 30-hour pace and an hour and ten minutes ahead of the cutoff.

Hallelujah. I might just fucking do this.

Rolling in to Michigan Bluff, I follow Edna’s voice as she leads me to Dad and Siamak where they have a camp chair ready along with a sock change and Ensure. For the first time all day long, I sit down. It feels good.

Don’t get comfortable though. Gotta keep moving.

Removing my socks I can now see that my feet are macerated and I know there’s no stopping the blisters now. We can only hope to contain them.

Gonna be a bit painful over the next 45 miles but if I finish it’ll be worth it so don’t cry over that now.

My crew has me in and out and on my way with my pacer, my love, my wife and for the first time in almost 16 hours I actually feel like I can do this.

Hell yeah.

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I spend the next two hours being Chatty Cathy, telling Edna every little detail leading up to where we are now. The high country. The snow. The mud suck. The climbs. The panic. The pain. The defeat. The descents. The joy. The return. The triumph. The love.

Being here. Right now.

Now is easy. I’m with my girl. I let her set the pace and all I have to do is follow.

It’s dark. We turn on our headlamps and slow ever so much as our vision narrows. Still, before I know it, we’re at Foresthill (mile 62) and Dad and Siamak are again there waiting for us.

We say hi and grab a Red Bull (I think) but we don’t stay long. Keenly aware of the clock, Edna has me in and out the station, making me run hard down to Cal-1 (mile 65.7), Cal-2 (mile 70.7) and Cal-3 (mile 73).

I’m doing relatively well (awake, alert, semi-stable), but on the steep drops the loose rock footing of the trail starts to have a negative effect on my knees (both stiff and achy) and feet (severely blistered, everywhere).

I start to let out little screams on the descents.

OUCH!

SHIT!

FUUUUUUUCK!!!

“I know, mi amor. Me too. Me too. Está bien, vámanos!”

Around 3 a.m. I start to get sleepy. Yawning. Belching still occasionally and then yawning and stumbling some more. Edna splits a 5-Hour Energy with me.

YEEEEEEE HAAAAAAAAA!

Back to life, right on down to the river.

We get to Rucky Chucky (mile 78) and Dad and Siamak, once again, are waiting for us handing out Ensures, ice and lots of encouragement.

We don’t stay long. Edna is adamant about getting in and out of aid stations. She did her homework and knows all the cut-off times. She is working hard to buy time so I can stay well ahead of that 30-hour mark. She is awesome.

We say goodbye to Dad and Siamak and, like we’d just went down the ultra rabbit hole, some volunteers put glow-in-the-dark necklaces around our necks and push us towards raft boats while saying “Welcome to the River Crossing!”

This is like Disneyland, I thought to myself. Ultra Disneyland. Why not.

We begin to cross the river in a raft with an Irishman (I remember because of the accent) and a few other crazy folks who thought running 100 miles in the Sierra Nevadas might be “fun”.

Hmmm. I like ultras. Mostly when I’m done running them. And I usually enjoy the first 10-20 miles before my legs go to shit… but to be honest, I haven’t “enjoyed” much of this race. It has been mostly suffering. Then again, suffering makes non-suffering WAY better than suffering…

“We’re here!” the boat captain says.

“Vamos, mi amor!”

“Ándale!”

We go. Sorta. We climb. Up to Green Gate. It’s a long climb and my sluggish legs and labored heart are starting to revolt.

I feel sick again. My heart rate soars. I have to stop and catch my breath several times.

“You can do it, mi amor!”

Okay, okay, okay… if you say so. I try. I do the best I can. We reach the top of Green Gate (mile 79.8) well ahead of the cut-off and even though my body is throbbing with question marks in the way of blisters, knee pain, busted toenails and aches, I start to feel like this is probably going to happen for me.

NOT YET! Don’t let your mind wander. Not yet. Stay focused. Anything can happen.

Indeed. Head down. Plug away.

“The sun will bring us back to life, mi amor,” says my wife, noting the chirping birds and squeaky rays of sun bursting through the trees. I know those same rays are going to scorch me as I try to get to the finish line but I welcome them anyway. I could use some pep in my step.

We get to Auburn Lake Trails (mile 85.2) and dig some Ensure and Red Bull out of our drop bag while a man dressed as a hot, mini-skirt clad nun fills my water bottles with ice water. I’m not sure if it’s really a man or really a nun or a woman or what but I’m laughing because it’s six in the morning and I’ve been running all night through the wilderness with my hot wife and some busted blistered feet so I don’t know I just ahhhhhhh what the hell go with it.

The Ensures are keeping me alive! Yay for dietary supplements for the elderly! My wife was SUPER SMART TO BRING THEM!

ALSO…. I like fruit!

And ice is cool, man!

Are we having fun yet?

It’s getting hot. Sun is coming out. Just following my wife now. Not saying much. Thinking less. My feet hurt. Fuck. Every step is a bomb in my shoe. Ugh.

We’re at Pointed Rocks (mile 94.3) and Dad and Siamak are there feeding me Ensure again, stuffing ice in my face and neck and BUUUUUUUUUUURN.

The ice is good but since I’ve been wet basically all day long; I am chafed all over, especially down there, so now I’m aware of that as well and oh yay isn’t this some kind of awesome party with genital chafing, blisters and rocks in your shoes? I must be a VIP.

But hey, I’m okay! I’m going to finish. I think! We’re 15 minutes ahead of 30-hour time and 45 minutes ahead of the cut-off so no matter what we gotta get going!!!

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“See you in Auburn!” I tell the crew as they we fly jog plod off.

Just six miles to go!!!

It hurts but we move anyway… racing that damn clock!

I LOVE MY WIFE! SHE IS AWESOME! I LOVE NATURE! IT IS AWESOME! I LOVE ENSURES! THEY ARE AWESOME!

We reach No Hands Bridge (mile 96.8) and stop only to be doused in ice water before we get right back to running. AND WE ARE RUNNING! High turnover! Get those legs moving. I gotta finish this shit!

SLAM! BAM! RAMA LAMA DING DONG!

I stub my right toe into a rock and the toenail gets flipped up, perpendicular to my toe! What the FRANKENSTEIN?!?!

AHHHHHHH! I scream. I stop and bend down and try to fix it but Edna’s says, “No, we have to keep moving, mi amor!”

“But it hurts! It hurts bad!”

“Ya sé, pero vámanos. It’s our last chance. We have to push. We can’t stop. Vámanos!”

Damn it, she’s right. Don’t cry. Suck it up, buttercup. Just another lost toenail.

imrs.phpWe keep running downhill and as we finally start our final big ascent up towards Robie Point I notice I have the Curt Schilling bloody sock thing going as blood soaks through to the top of my shoe. GNARLY!

Never mind, we gotta keep busting ass. Less than an hour before the finish line shuts down let’s get going!!!!

We climb up, up, up… “Welcome to Robie Point!” they say to cheers and claps and drums? And bells? And whistles?

Or is that just happening in my head?

Doesn’t matter. We’re almost done. We’re on blacktop now. Mile 98.9. People from the town of Auburn are out and cheering. They’re smiling. They’re making me feel like a million bucks.

The next several minutes are a blur until I see Siamak… he’s elated, jumping out of his skin.

“Man you kicked ass!” he says whipping out his phone, recording Edna and I as we enter the Placer High School track for the last 300 meters of this monster race.

We’re running. Floating. SOARing.

This is really happening. Now.

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From a depressed, overweight smoker who decided enough is enough… to a curious newly fit young adult who wondered if people could really run more than a marathon… to a seasoned ultra vet with one last wish to run the coveted Western States 100… alongside his hot wife for that matter… and now look… dreams are coming true.

Good grief I am in heaven.

Edna and I hold hands as we cross the finish line in 29 hours, 38 minutes, 45 seconds.

I kiss her and thank her and look for a Coke.

EPILOGUE

The 2017 Western States was a doozy, no doubt. The numbers prove that. Regardless of the conditions, I pictured myself as a Golden Hour finisher, and that’s exactly what we did. The Golden Hour refers to the last hour that participants have to finish the race; and this year there were two who just skated in, one with only 8 seconds to go.

Fucking magic, man.

But wait, there’s more:

I have a great Dad who went out of his way to help me and the crew. Not being able to get around real well himself, he sacrificed his body to make sure I got what I needed when I needed it. He was also the one driving everywhere, not easy in these remote areas. He’s been there for all the big events and for that I am truly grateful. Thanks, Baba!

Also, I want you to know that my buddy, Siamak is a champ! He is so smart and quick-thinking and calming. He was a great crew leader. He also took some great photos and videos — images I will cherish forever.

And did you know? My wife is the BEST! I love you, mi amor! Edna was such a great pacer. She ran 45 miles herself and never once complained about anything. She was on her game, quick with splits, cut-offs, milestones. She was on it, shoving gels in my face and making me suck it up when everything got blurry. I wouldn’t have made it without her.

The race itself… man, what can one say? The volunteers, the management, the everything… TOP NOTCH. The aid stations were superb. Everyone there was there to help. It was a family.

I felt loved.

I also felt the pain… of the terrain, of course. My feet were hamburger. My chafing was major league. The struggle was real. It’s been a few days and I’m still limping.

People often ask me why I would subject myself to such torture and the only thing I can really think of is that I like to see what I can do on my own two feet. When I know I can run 100 miles through hell and back, suddenly life gets easier. I’m able to do much more than I ever thought I could. I try a little harder. I go a little further. I stick with things a little longer.

It makes me a better friend, husband, person.

Through it all, I find out who I am.

And for someone who spent most of his life not having a clue who he was, that’s pretty damn powerful.

 

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10 responses

  1. Awesome read and write up Jeff, congratulations on a gutsy and impressive performance! Keep up the awesome work.

    June 30, 2017 at 07:13

    • Thanks, Greg! Much appreciated. Thanks for taking the time to read.

      June 30, 2017 at 12:24

  2. I love your running stories, Jeff! You and your wife, Edna inspire me to keep running, keep moving forward; no matter the odds I’m up against!

    Sincerely, Frado

    June 30, 2017 at 08:30

    • Hi Frado! Thanks for the kind words. That’s awesome that we could be some help to keep you moving forward one step at a time. Way to go!

      June 30, 2017 at 12:25

      • Jeff, you have inspired me to sign up for the Woodstock 100k in Pickney Michigan. My training begins now in order to run this race next September.
        The most I have run is 26.2, but I’m up for the challenge of a 100k.

        Thanks,
        Frado

        June 30, 2017 at 12:46

  3. Clemente González

    Muchas felicidades es un gran honor conocerlo y me motiva a seguir adelante! Muy emocionante e interesante su experiencia en esta carrera 🏃 reciban mis saludos, respetos y admiración ❗ profe Jeff y a Edna así como a su pa’ y amigo Siamak! Great work see you at class soon!!! 🏅 🏆

    July 1, 2017 at 18:13

  4. Congrats!! And fantastic race report! I loved every minute. I’m a local to the WS area and I could not love this race more and what it does for people … truly a magical place/race. Enjoy recovery … oh and your crew was ON IT! Awesome job.

    July 20, 2017 at 12:23

  5. Adam

    Can’t believe I’m just getting around to reading this now. Great recap, and so awesome that you got to fulfill a dream race. Life is good. Who knows what’s next.

    August 29, 2017 at 16:01

  6. Pingback: Western States 100 - The Ultra Wire

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