Running up, over and through the cogs

Archive for March, 2013

Trail Running Is Messy and So Is Life: The 2013 Paleozoic Trail Runs 25K Race Report

paleozoicTrail_150There was a time in my life when I would have done all I could to avoid any type of mess — either real-world or proverbial.

Then I became a runner.

Nowadays, mud spattered tights and mucus crusted gloves are as common for me as bloody nipples and permastink-laden technical tees.

Meh, so what. As long as I’m having fun, right?

And boy did I have some fun on Saturday, March 16, 2013 whilst gliding, sliding, hurdling and traversing the ever treacherous and never clean Paleozoic Trail Runs 25K race course at the nearby forest preserve of Palos Heights.  For me, the fun began before the race even started because I was at an event where I knew A TON OF PEOPLE!  Having been a part of the trail and ultrarunning community for a couple of years now, I really feel like a part of the family.  And that’s what the local New Leaf Ultra Runs group is to me: family.  We run together, we get dirty together, we laugh together.  That many smiling faces, firm handshakes and strong fist bumps is enough to make one’s day.  Running the race was just extra.

And, to be honest, it was a bit confusing as well, but there were many reasons for this.  As an inaugural event, I expected some obstacles outside of those offered by the freeze-to-thaw-to-freeze-back-to-thaw terrain.  There was some uncertainty about course markings (weather washed a lot of them away).  One of the aid stations wasn’t there when I got to it.  I had a guy running a few inches off my heels for three quarters of the race.  And I was trying to take it easy because a few days prior I aggravated my right ITB running intervals.

But I had a fantastic time in the cold, soupy weather, surrounded by good friends and warm community.  I’m going to skip my regular play-by-play reporting of this race because all of the confusion caused by my missing a turn, adding mileage where it shouldn’t have been and then stopping to scratch my head a few times sort of took me out of my normal thinking patterns and now when I think back to the race all I can remember is putting one foot forward through muddy muck with a great big I-don’t-know-where-the-heck-I-am-going smile on my face.

When I finished, my Garmin read 1:55:47, but only 14.29 miles, a bit short of the stated 25K (15.5 miles).  Upon further review, I missed a section near Bull Frog Lake but added some mileage on the east loop.  All in all, I was still tired when I finished and I crossed the line with a healthy ITB/knee.

And oh yeah, this time I beat Peter Sagal (maybe? I dunno, after my misguided route maybe I didn’t).  Still, I enjoyed chatting with him this go around, as he was quite lost too.  In fact, I think everyone was lost at one point or another.

But I will be back next year.  No doubt about it.

Meanwhile, Boston is just four weeks away…

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For an excellent recap on this race, check out Dan Solera’s entry, where I make a special cameo alongside everyone’s favorite beer racer, Otter.

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Six Weeks to Beantown and Finally Baaaaack!

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Patriot’s Day is only six weeks away, which means my long awaited dance with the World Series of marathons will soon be a dream come true.  The natural excitement and nervous energy that come along with it will only escalate.

But I’m down with that.

Yesterday I nailed a 16 mile long run with 11 miles at 7:15 pace, with no aches or pains — yet another promising sign that my ITB issues are finally far off in the background.  I wasn’t going to celebrate my lack of ITBS symptoms until I was able to sustain a good month of dedicated speed and hill training alongside the general aerobic long runs that are the staple of any solid marathon training plan.

Five weeks and counting, no residual aches, pains or soreness.  I’m feeling damn good.

My buildup for this race, albeit unorthodox due to the limited training and mileage prescribed by coming off of a serious injury, has been about as much as I could ask for.  I’m not overdoing it.  I’m resting when my body directs me.  But most of all, I’ve adjusted my mind to allow for a fun, possibly once-in-a-lifetime race experience.  Rather than being hellbent on time goals, I’m focusing on toeing the line healthy,  ready to deliver on whatever my body seems capable of on April 15, 2013.

This is in large contrast to my normal marathon training as I’m a bit of a perfectionist.  I instinctively marry myself to routine, to nailing splits, to chasing down the guy ahead of me.  And while I know quite well that outside of myself, not one single person on the planet really cares what time I get when crossing the finish line, I still feel like if I don’t throw down a personal best in every race then I’m not doing it right.

WRONG.

I’ve set some modest goals for Boston 2013.  I haven’t regained my Chicago 2012 fast legs yet, but I’d like to finish somewhere between a 3:15 and 3:30, mindful of the fact that finishing and living in the moments presented by the most storied marathon in the world are, above all else, the most important things.  If, on race day, my abilities push me beyond the 3:30 mark, then so be it.  I vow to cross the line with a smile and a triumphant fist.

The cliche “it’s not the destination that matters but the journey” comes to mind.  In my case, the journey has been profound in what it has revealed about me, about how I handle adversity both instinctively and through contemplation.

For someone like me, opportunities like running the Boston Marathon are certainly the exception, not the norm.  I will treat the experience as exceptional, from Hopkinton to Boylston Street, and everywhere in between.