Running up, over and through the cogs

Posts tagged “Taper madness

Mindful Perspective, Reinterpreting Pain

During U.S. Olympian Aly Raisman’s gold medal floor routine, NBC commentator Tim Daggett mentioned her unique ability to view the nervous energy associated with such daring gymnastics (something most of us call “pressure” or “anxiety”) into something much more performance enhancing.  He called it “excitement”.

What a novel yet extraordinarily simple idea!

Embrace the nervousness, the anxiety, the pressure and transform it into something positive.  Use it as a springboard for optimal performance.  Face it.  Take it.  And run with it.

Digging deeper, I know that, for me, most of that pre-race energy comes from knowing the type of pain that will be involved.  If you have ever raced a race, I mean, really put yourself out there, leaving nothing behind, then you know the type of pain I am talking about.  It’s the type of pain dictated by the central governor, that annoyingly present theoretic portion of the brain that says, “Stop! Are you crazy? This is unnecessary!”

It’s also the type of pain that, when challenged and overridden, leads to bouts of ecstasy.  That’s one of the reasons why I love racing.  I love pushing myself beyond what I think I can do.  Even in failure, I am guaranteed to experience something most people never will, a satisfying feat all by itself.

Overriding the central governor, attempting to accomplish extraordinary goals, I remind myself of Dave Terry’s wisdom as told by Scott Jurek: “Not all pain is significant.”

And just in case you don’t believe that, consider the fact that Jurek won the 2007 Hardrock 100 on a severely sprained ankle, or that Thomas Voeckler’s captivating Stage 10 victory at the 2012 Tour de France — the one that had him making all sorts of uncomfortable faces towards the end — was done despite a bum knee.

I know a thing or two about pain myself.  Just look at my face as I crossed the finish line during my current marathon PR.  That was a painful race, no doubt.  But the pain has long subsided and all that is left is the purest joy I have ever come to know.


A Big Giddy Bag of Playful Nerves

Since my last long training run nine days ago, I’ve really been taking it easy, which has made tapering for the Ice Age Trail 50… well, EASY!

Having made overtraining mistakes in the past that left me feeling as stupid as I was hobbled, I made it a point to stay focused this time.

The most important thing about last week was preventing a nagging/weakened plantaris from getting worse by… just chilling out.  As hard as it was on my psyche, I only ran three times last week: 10 miles on Wednesday, 12 on Saturday and 4 on Sunday.

And today, as I try to juggle the constant, vivid daydreams about Saturday’s upcoming 50 mile adventure with the actual preparation (gear, nutrition, instructions for crew), my body is thanking me for all the rest.  For the first time since Earth Day, my right leg feels pretty strong.  The plantaris strain has healed enough so that it isn’t painful.  There are still some occasional signs that it is weaker than my right, but such orthopedic mysteries seem to always pop up for me during race week.

What matters the most is I’m gonna be good to run on Saturday.

For a long ass time too.

Since this will be my first dance with the 50 mile distance, I’m going to be conservative.  I don’t want to screw anything up.  My goal is to finish.  That’s it.  I won’t be racing or killing myself to stay with the lead pack.  Having never run more than 32 miles at one time, I will be entering the unknown for at least 2-3 hours at the end of the day, and I can’t tell you how excited I am about that.

Hell, I’m just excited about everything associated with this event!  I’m ecstatic that this is all finally happening!  Finally!  The day I’ve been looking forward to for almost a year now is finally going to be here.  And while the race week nerves try to flip my stomach, an actual flip through my training log reassures me that I already DID all the hard work necessary to finish this thing strong, to accomplish what I set out to do.

And isn’t that what all this crazy running is about?  Isn’t it about accomplishment?  Isn’t it about surprising yourself?  Isn’t it about nature and about community and about love?

Hell yes it is.

I can’t wait to share my experience!


Taper Madness, Training Clarity

I once dated a girl who got real weird during her taper before the big race.  As one who was already quite prone to the overly dramatic, she blamed everything on “the taper.”  I’m irritable because of the taper.  I can’t sleep because of the taper.  Don’t talk to me because of the taper.

Jeesh.

Of course, everyone is different, but by the time I get to my typical three-week taper before race day, I’m so damn tired that I need some accumulated rest.  In fact, I train to get to the taper, pushing myself hard in the weeks that lead up to it, knowing the reward will be a respite.

I welcome the shortened sessions on my feet, the dialed back tempos.  Get me a foam roller, a bowl of pasta and a bottle of Two Buck Chuck and I’m good!

Only once race week comes does a hint of that taper madness anxiety slip into my conscience.  I’m no psychiatrist, but I feel that most of what I feel is simply a case of the race jitters and nothing else.  I mean, what good would I be doing myself by running more miles when I’m supposed to be saving my energy for the upcoming race?

Still, whenever anyone (myself included) mentions any symptom of that dreaded taper madness, my universal go-to cure is to open up that logbook and look at all the great work that’s already been done.  As any seasoned runner will admit, the guts of one’s training comes before the taper, not during it.

If you’re not ready to tackle your goals three weeks out from race day, you might as well treat the race as a fun run.

So take pride in all that hard work, relax as race day approaches and tell taper madness to take a hike (preferably along the entire Appalachian Trail, so it stays away for a while).