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Posts tagged “Ice Age Trail

DNS: Did Not Start, Did Nothing Stupid, Did Not Sulk

Ice Age Trail 50 2014 StartIt was a game-time decision. I was holding on to hope all the way up to the final countdown of the Ice Age Trail 50k race start, but ultimately, not running was the only correct decision I could make. It was my first DNS (Did Not Start).

Did nothing stupid.

Did not sulk.

Well, okay, I sulked for about 10 minutes, but sulking sucks and I didn’t want to be a baby, so I found a way to enjoy the rest of the beautiful day by hanging out with friends and cheering in runners at the finish line. There was also beer.

In a long, illustrious running career, a DNS is probably going to happen sometime. Now that my first one is out of the way, I hope to learn from it.

Running has many lessons and this week I learned that, just as in real life, nothing is for certain. Shit happens all the time and much of what constitutes one’s character comes from what he does when life doesn’t go according to plan.

On Monday I was boasting to friends about how good I felt — how after a year-long struggle with one nagging injury after the other, I was finally starting to feel like I had my fast legs again. So on Tuesday, when doing hill repeats with some guys from the gym, I thought nothing about trying to race the speedy 20-year olds up a steep incline.

It only took one overzealous bound for my left Achilles to riiiiiiiiiiiiip.

I was lucky that it didn’t rupture, but the damage was significant enough that I was left to a pathetic hobble on Wednesday, a sad limp on Thursday and a passable yet tenuous walk on Friday. On Saturday, there in the Nordic Loop parking lot with hope as my only companion, I tested out the heel using every functional aid possible: heel cups, wraps, heat, ice.

Nope. Can’t run. Hurts with every step. 31 miles on rolling terrain with a bum Achilles is a good recipe for rupture, Jeff. And a rupture would mean losing the entire season. No running. No nada.

10 minutes. I gave myself 10 minutes to feel sorry for myself.

But then I put on my big boy pants and went back out there and rang my cowbell like a boss.

A day of glorious weather with awesome people is a great day spent regardless of the activity. I had a blast, despite not being able to run, and I got to see my girlfriend conquer another ultra finish line with her trademark ear-to-ear smile.

Jeff and Edna Ice Age Trail 50 2014

A few more days on the mend hopefully and I’ll be back in action — lesson learned and rarin’ to go.

And no more racing kids who I already know can kick my ass.

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Distances Obscene In 2014?

jeff lung racing rocky

While I patiently wait for the Polar Vortex to subside so mother nature can give me a cleaner, safer surface on which to train, I continue to battle the elements the best I can. I’m approaching the end of my fourth week of Boston Marathon training and about half of my runs thus far have been on a treadmill.

Physically, I feel great. My body is working well. As I slowly build my endurance, I am getting regular sports massage, with lots of attention placed on those cranky calves. All systems are go for Boston right now, and while I continue to be conservative in my training, I still dream of running a sub-3 race come April 21, 2014.

That’s my “A” goal. That’s the dream of dreams, as it has been and will continue to be until I finally make that dream a reality.

But there is no denying that my conservative training approach (at least for now), may make running 6:50 pace for 26.2 miles on a challenging course more difficult than I’d hoped. Right now my speed workouts — hampered by sub-freezing temps and rusty legs — haven’t been ideal. The turnover is there, the leg and core strength is there, but the cardiovascular system has a long way to go to keep up with my demands. With 14 weeks of training left, I’m not sweatin’ it. I am going to give it my all on Patriot’s Day regardless, and that, ultimately, is all that counts.

But what about after Boston?

Yes, indeed, the time has come, my friends. In 2014 I aim to complete my first 100 mile race. The Pinhoti 100, on November 1, in Heflin, Alabama, will be the scene. Lots of New Leaf and M.U.D.D. friends will be there. I’m hoping to get my dad down there. Siamak the Beast has agreed to pace me. I’m ready to go further than I’ve ever gone before, mentally and physically.

Every race I run from now until April 21 will be training for Boston, and every race I run post-Boston will be in preparation for the hundo.

Here is my tentative race plan:

January 11 – The Frozen Gnome 50k
My good friends from the McHenry County Ultrarunning Dudes and Dudettes (M.U.D.D.) put on great events and this one looks to be no different. 30 inches of snow accumulation so far this winter? Freezing rain? Hills galore? Bring on the suffering!

February 2 – The Groundhog Day Half Marathon
4-ish mile loopty loops in bone-chilling, snow covered Grand Rapids, Michigan? Like Phil said: I’ll give you a winter prediction: It’s gonna be cold, it’s gonna be grey, and it’s gonna last you for the rest of your life.

March 2 – The Armadillo Dash Half Marathon
As one who seeks out opportunities where travel and racing can be combined, I found what looks to be a quaint half marathon in College Station, TX about a 40-minute drive from my dad’s place. And while Texas temps in March may not be tropical, they are almost certain to be warmer than anything I’ll find in the Chi.

April 21 – The Boston Marathon
No subtext necessary.

May 10 – Ice Age 50k
After the ass kickin’ I got last year, this is my 2014 revenge race. With some better planning and a good understanding of the course, I am hoping to go under 5 hours this time around.

July 18-19 – Christmas in July 24 Hour
What better way to prepare myself for my first hundred than running in circles for 24 hours? This race, put on by some friends of mine from the New Leaf club, is in my suburban backyard (Lisle, IL) and promises to be one heck of a fiesta. It’s on pavement. It’s on a short, one mile loop course. I’m looking forward to a post-race Frankenstein walk like I’ve never had before.

August 31 – The Mexico City Marathon
One of my best friends lives in Mexico City. I’m in love with a Mexican. The Mexico City Marathon, at 5000 feet of elevation, offers a scenic, challenging course. ¿Cómo no voy a correrlo? ¡Que onda, güey!

October 12 – The Chicago Marathon
Running my fourth straight Chicago Marathon proves to be the lone wild card in my 2014 schedule. Rumor (and history) suggests that this race is soon going to move to a lottery selection. I HOPE NOT! I remain hopeful that the registration process will be open like it has been. My steadfast ninja fingers are prepared to click forward the $170+ dollars as fast as they possibly can. For me, the biggest test with Chicago this year will be running it as a training run as opposed to balls-to-the-wall redlining.

November 1 – The Pinhoti 100
The holy grail. The heavy hitter. The big kahuna. For the greater part of 2014, my heart, and perhaps more literally my legs, will be focused on traversing 100 miles in one shot, for the very first time. And while I do feel a bit funny about throwing myself into a 100 miler that doesn’t even have a website (I’m told it is currently under construction), I have been assured by my friends — most importantly, Siamak, who ran it as his first hundred in 2012 — that this race is as challenging as it is breathtaking. I’m hoping it’s more breathtaking in the metaphorical sense, though in a 100 mile race it seems like there will certainly be some moments were even taking a breath seems impossible.

I don’t know.

But I’ll see.

Because THAT — the unknown, the adventure, the THRILL of it all — is what makes running long so worthwhile, fulfilling and fun!


2013: A Year of Patience, Perseverance and Perspective

2013 pic
After a 2012 that saw me break beaucoup barriers and dream of crossing the marathon finish line with a 2-hour-something time, it would be easy to assume that 2013 was a letdown year for me. I didn’t come close to my goal time for 26.2. I suffered through a long recovery from ITBS. I got a nasty case of Achilles tendonitis.

But just like in any other discourse, life is what you make it.

So, positively speaking:

I started my own business.

I negative split the marathon for the first time while simultaneously experiencing triumph through tragedy.

I played in the woods with my friends.

I paced two other friends in two different but equally epic 100 mile races: Kettle Moraine 100 and the iconic, granddaddy of them all, Western States 100.

Despite the heavy rain and relentless terrain, I answered the bell for all 50 miles of the Minnesota Voyageur and had a kickass time doing it.

I PR’d the half marathon in one of my favorite local races.

I played in the woods with my friends, again.

I was reminded to be grateful for what I have, to live in the moment, to enjoy every second of life as it comes.

I volunteered at the Earth Day 50k, the Des Plaines River Trail 50 Miler and the inaugural Naperville Marathon, perfecting the art of cowbell ringing in one hand while handing out aid with the other.

I had another race report published in Ultrarunning Magazine (October issue).

I spent hours and hours pounding pavement, traversing trails, meditating through movement.

And I fell in love.

Thank you, 2013. My graciously heartfelt smile remains from ear to ear.

Happy New Year!

DPRT 50 finish line 2013


Lux Aeterna and Oreos: The 2013 Ice Age Trail 50k Race Report

ice age trailheadLast year, the Ice Age Trail was home to a most glorious running experience.  It was such a memorable event that I was absolutely adamant about coming back.  But when it came time to register, an injury-laden winter and the knowledge that I would be fresh off a challenging Boston Marathon made me bump down to the 50k option.

On May 11, 2013, I ran the Ice Age Trail 50k — a challenging yet highly runnable course and now all I can think about is running it again in 2014.  This is my story…

Pre-Race

It’s 4:15 a.m. and my alarm sounds off along with my buddy Siamak’s.  The unison doesn’t last long as we are both wide awake.  In fact, I’ve been tossing and turning all night long and just happy to be fully awake now, ready to get the day started.

My off-and-on sleep was the result of the warm hotel room and a subliminal tick infestation planted in my brain by our waitress at Sperino’s the night before.  She warned us that “the ticks were bad”.  Indeed, I was tick-incepted by an Elkhornian and I didn’t get much sleep because I was more worried about the invisible critters sucking on my blood than traversing 31 miles of trail.

Still, I feel pretty fresh now that I’m awake.  Siamak and I eat, go through our respective rituals of preparation, and by 5:10 we are in the car, driving to the start line.

As expected, the start/finish area at John Muir is a who’s who of familiar, crazy runner folk.  Even though the majority of the people stirring about are running the 50 mile race, which begins at 6:00 a.m., I am glad I am here among the crowd because I won’t see most of them again until much later in the day.

The New Leafers and MUDDers are out in full force.  I exchange in many a hug and high-five.  At 6 a.m. sharp, the RD sends the 50 milers on their way.  I head back to the car for a much needed nap.

7:45 a.m.

My alarm wakes me from what was a fitting 90 minute nap (or was I meditating just now?) and I feel fantastic.  I grab the gear I’m going to need (a handheld water bottle, gloves and a cap), I lube up where necessary (this is becoming automatic nowadays) and I head over to the start line.  Here I run into two other recurring Run Factory faces, Dan and Otter.  This is the first ultra distance race for both of them so I remind them to ENJOY the experience, have fun, take a look around.  They both look pumped.  I’m excited for them and can’t wait to hear about their experiences once this is all done.

Me, Dan and Otter at the start line of the 2013 Ice Age Trail 50k.

Me, Dan and Otter at the start line of the 2013 Ice Age Trail 50k.

We cheer on our friends in the 50 miler coming through the 9 mile mark at the start/finish line before the race director corrals all the 50k runners and tells us to get on our marks… set…

Miles 1-13, Out to Horseriders and Back

Here we go!  The start line energy is high as I take off, trying to remind myself that ultras require pacing.  Hell, all races require pacing!  It’s just that the longer the distance, the less I tend to adhere to that important nugget of truth.  Take it easy, Jeff, take it easy, I tell myself.  We got a long way to go.

But, as we start to cruise the luscious single track, it isn’t long before we hit the first series of downhills and I… Simply.  Can’t.  Help myself.

I feel great.  I feel strong.  I feel like flying.

WEEEEEEE!!!

Yep.  I’m doing this.  I shouldn’t be, but I am.  I am definitely FLYING down these hills.  I’m power hiking up them, but I am flying down.  Fast.  Too fast.  I know this.  I know this!  But I’m also loving every second of it and am willing to deal with the repercussions later, if they come (they do).

As I pump my arms, tilt my pelvis forward and allow my heels to kick me in the butt on the descent, I think of all the reasons why I should check my ambition right now:

  • Limited weekly mileage (no more than 35 per week) since January
  • This first 13 mile section is all rocks and roots, quite technical and hard on my unseasoned feet compared to the easier Nordic sections coming up
  • I’ve run on trails just ONCE since November and it was only for 25k
  • I have only run more than 20 miles in one shot ONE TIME since October and that was at the Boston Marathon, just a few weeks ago
  • I have too much energy exploding through my being unchecked for this to end well

I internalize all of the above, and then, like a lot of ultra freaks, I quickly disregard everything and decide to just have fun.

I’ll fly when I wanna fly, walk when I wanna walk.

Later I will also walk when I don’t want to walk, but I’m getting ahead of myself.

Right now I’m four miles in and the field has finally spread out.  I’m marveling at the lush green landscape, the twisting turns of the trail and the pesky pricks of the rocks under my feet.  Every two seconds I also check for ticks.  Damn you, lucid dream inspiring Sperino’s waitress! 

Suddenly, two strong fellas are right on my tail, so much so that I look back and offer them open passage on my left.

No, we’re good, the one in front replies.  This is a good pace for us.

Cool, I reply.  I like to let ‘er rip on the downs.  I’ll be power hiking the ups.

They fall right into place and suddenly we are one.  Down, down, down.  Up, up, up.  Their names are Tim and Mike.  This is their first ultra.  They are having a blast.

And they are pretty darn quick too.  Turns out one of them (sorry, I can’t remember which because they’re both behind me while we talk) is a Nike Pace Team leader who led the 3:25 pace group at the 2012 Chicago Marathon.

Do you know Chris?  He was my pace leader for the 3:05 group, had a California-bro accent of sorts.

Yes, I know Chris. 

Boom.  We are all instantly connected.  That was the best run of my life so far and I spend the next couple of miles rehashing the experience.  I get all jazzed, talking about fast marathons.  I seem to forget about pacing all together.  And when I find out they know another friend of mine, John from Grayslake, another Nike Pace Team leader, I get all bubbly telling them about some of our prior ultra battles (ED50k and Howl most notably).

Before I know it we are seeing the 50k leaders coming back towards us, approximately half a mile from the turnaround at Horseriders.  We all marvel at their speed, speak fondly of their poise.

It’s one thing to run fast.  It’s another to run fast on elevating, technical terrain.

We get to Horseriders.  It’s just the three of us and the aid station crew.  We chow down on some peanut butter and jelly.  A minute or two goes by and we are just eating and stretching, drinking and breathing.  But standing around too long in this chill is not comfortable so it’s time to go.  After all, it’s barely 50 degrees and the sky is cloudy — very, very cloudy.

The three of us take off back into the woods, but we aren’t a half mile back in before I realize they are going way faster than me up the hills and there’s no way I can keep up.  I tip my cap and wish them the best.  It’s going to be a long day yet.

Still, the next several miles present A LOT of smiles because I get to see all my friends passing the other direction.  As I scream down the hills I high-five and fist bump lots of folks, Dan and Otter included.  Everyone is looking good.  Everyone is smiling.

There’s no place I’d rather be right now.  THIS is the life!

I’m past 1o miles now and I won’t be seeing anyone else on this out-and-back section.  The next sign of human life will be at the start/finish line.

Hmm… I wonder if they have Oreos.  I could really go for some Oreos right now.

And just like that, my OCD kicks in and all I can think about are OREOS OREOS OREOS.  Such are the strange fixations of an ultra-distance race.  In my every day life I wouldn’t touch an Oreo cookie.  A drop of soda does not touch my mouth.  I make it a point to eat clean — very, very clean.  But throw me on a beautiful, wooded trail for hours on end and suddenly I will devour all processed foods and binge on soda pop.  Like a boss.

I get to the start/finish.  They have Oreos.

Hallelujah.

Miles 13-22, 1st Nordic Loop

It was nice to see some people at the start/finish line but I got a lot of work to do yet so off I go, back into solitary run mode.

Just a couple of miles in and I realize how much easier the Nordic loop is compared to the one I just finished.  Instead of technical, rocky, rooted, up and down terrain, what we have here is a lot of flat, grassy ski trail.  I should be able to fly through this.

SHOULD.  Of course, I can’t right now because I beat myself up during the first 13, flying downhill like I was a mountain goat or Killian Jornet.  Clearly, I am neither, as my quads and now achy heels can attest.

I am 16 miles in and anxiously looking for some hills.

Where are the hills?  My legs hurt and I want to walk.  Can I have a hill please?

No one can hear me.  I’m all by myself.  I have been all by myself since mile 8 so if I stop and walk, surely no one will see me.

A little bit of walking is allowed.  Right?

I turn the corner and I see a HILL!  I sprint towards it — OUCH — get to the base, and power hike up that baby.

For no good reason at all, Mozart’s Requiem pops into my head.  Lux Aeterna, the last movement where Wolfy takes us from the world of the living to the world of the dead, blasts through my ears.

Why, brain?  What are you trying to tell me? 

Oh boy.  I am tired.

While the IT band is just fine, my right hip starts to ache.  I’ve had this ache before.  It feels like bursitis.  I stop and stretch.  I massage it with my right thumb.  Doing so makes it feel better.  But as I stretch I notice the bottoms of my feet are sore too, probably from all the pounding during the first loop.  I wiggle my toes around… and yep, just as I thought, definitely got some nails loose.

Oh well!  What’s an ultra without losing some toenails?!?

REQUIEM, sings the choir.

Hey, finally some company, says a voice behind me.

I turn around and amazingly enough there is another human being!  I find out his name is Matt.  He’s from Wauwatosa and, of course, we know a lot of the same people from the running community.

As we marvel at how small the world really is, we also relax a little bit and find a nice cruising pace.  We are about 18 miles in now and I’m feeling pretty beat up.  Instead of complaining, I just hitch on to his heels and let the friendly conversation take us along.

Unfortunately for me though, Matt is much stronger right now and I have to dial back.  I know we are on sub-5 hour pace (which, for this course, is a fantastic time), but I just can’t sustain that right now.  I’m too tired.  When I stop to walk the hills it’s taking a lot more concentration than it should to contract my quads and I know it’s because I went out too fast.  I knew slogging along the second half could be the result of my eager start, but it’s way too late now.

A slog it is!  Might as well enjoy it.

…REQUIEM…

I complete the first Nordic loop, reach the start/finish aid station and all I want is Oreos.  Duh.

Nom nom nom…

Miles 22-31, 2nd Nordic Loop

Just 9 miles to go, I tell myself.  You could walk 9 miles.  In your sleep.  Speaking of sleep, check for ticks!

…REQUIEM…

No ticks, but my armpits are kinda chafed.

Oh what I would give for some Vaseline right now.

And just like that, as if Mother Nature confused “Vaseline” for “sunlight”, the clouds in the sky part on cue, revealing a glorious, GLORIOUS sun.

Take that, Mozart!  HALLELUJAH!

Sunlight, Vaseline, whatevs.  The sun is out!  The sun is out I tell you!

This picks me up as I try my best to run the entire first stretch of my second Nordic loop.  But the truth is, my run is more of a shuffle than anything right now.

Doesn’t matter.  Still moving.  Still having a blast.  And if I just keep moving, there will be more… Oreos!!!

Still, there isn’t much company.  There is a tall, skinny white guy with a Prefontaine mustache out here every once in a while cheering for me (and others I would assume).  Each time I see him I light up with a smile, and try to look as if I’m running strong (even though I’m not).

Next year we’re taking the first loop easy, then flying on the second and third.

Next year? I ask myself.

Yes, of course, next year, I reply to myself.  You’re doing Boston again next year, then you’re doing this 50k again.  It will be deja vu all over again, except less aches and pains.  Probably.  

Maybe.  

Hopefully.

Deal.  Just make sure there are plenty of Oreos.

The 27.2 mile aid station is an absolute oasis in the forest.  I devour what I can of those tasty, chocolatey, cream-filled treats.  I stretch a little.  And like I often do during long distance races, I find myself in a poignantly emotional state.  I take the time to thank the volunteers and gush about how grateful I am that they are all there.  I’ve been on both sides of the table now and volunteering is often harder than running the race.  Even though my butt hurts, my hip aches and my feet are sore, I am much happier to be less than 5 miles from being done.  These guys are still going to be here a while.

With the volunteers’ blessing and the bright sun in the sky urging me on, I take off on the last leg of my journey.  To get me to keep moving I focus on landmarks up ahead, urging myself to just run to that tree, then walk for a few seconds and get around that bend, then stretch for a bit.

After several exhausting rounds of this tortuously fun process, I see the Prefontaine ‘stache guy one last time and he tells me I’m less than a mile from the finish.

Please tell me there is beer, I plead.

Hell yeah, man!  Lots of beer!  Good beer too!

That’s all I needed to hear.  Suddenly my legs are fine and I’m flying again.

I hear a cow bell.  And voices.  And more Requiem.

There’s the finish line.

With a confident and incessant arm pump I cross the finish line in 5 hours 22 minutes and 11 seconds, sporting a big-ass smile and chafey armpits.

I couldn’t be much happier.

Post-Race

Besides the glorious trail running experience, the other main reason to run Ice Age is for the post-race party.  Lots of free beer.  The food is good.  And there’s nothing like sitting at the finish line cheering on your friends.  Most of my pals were running the 50 mile race, so to see them all come through in such epic fashion was a real cherry on top of my day.

Plus, my friend Moffat and I got the McHenry County Ultrarunning Dude and Dudettes’ mascot super drunk:

gerome the gnome

Like I already told myself:

See ya again next year, Ice Age!


Dreams Realized, Lessons Learned, Bars Raised

Goodbye, dear 2012, and thanks for the memories.  From a running standpoint, 2012 will go down as the year I upped my game beyond what I ever thought was possible.  And I have the jawbreaking ear-to-ear smile to prove it.

I raced two major marathons and PR’d them both (Houston in January and Chicago in October).  The Chicago race served as my very first Boston Qualifier — a feat that leaves me eternally proud and acutely focused.

In May, I finished my very first 50 mile race at the Ice Age 50 and followed that up in August by logging 50.85 miles during the Howl at the Moon 8 Hour Run.  In the latter race, I also tasted another top ten finish (8th Overall), to go along with those achieved at Clinton Lake (8th Overall) and the Earth Day 50K (1st in Age Division, 4th Overall).

I also ran a few short races, completing my third Chinatown 5K (the race that started it all), while also logging a then PR in the half marathon at Batavia and a respectable time in my first short-distance trail event.

Plus, I got to spend a lot of time with my dear friends from the New Leaf Ultra Runs club, including two unforgettable 100 mile Supergirl pacing experiences (Mohican 100 and Hallucination 100), an inspiring Run Across Illinois and the most liberating impromptu adventure run I have yet to have.

No doubt, 2012 was something to remember.

It was also something to learn from, as the continuous pushing of my body without adequate rest eventually led to an IT band injury and a sincere reevaluation of my training techniques.  But I am happy to report that after 6 weeks off and a highly focused physical therapy regimen, I have begun to run again pain-free and feel confident that I will be able to put forth 100% effort in training for my next major event, the Boston Marathon.

Indeed, a sub-3 hour attempt at Houston in two weeks will not be possible.  However, I was able to transfer my registration down to the half marathon, which I will use as a barometer for my current fitness, the base from which I will begin Boston training in earnest.

And while I do have a couple of 50Ks and perhaps one 50 miler on the schedule for 2013, my main focus will be on the marathon distance and breaking that 3 hour mark.  I am obsessed (in the very best way possible) with seeing my name followed by a 2-something marathon time.  I will do it, by golly.

I will run 26.2 miles in less than 3 hours.

And when I do, I’m having a big party.  You’re all invited.

Peace, love and all the running happiness in the world!


Primal Plunge: The 2012 Ice Age Trail 50 Mile Ultramarathon Race Report

Photograph by Ali Engin, 2012

“Running is a vehicle for self-discovery.”
–Scott Jurek

In May of 2009, I was a pack-and-a-half a day smoker who drank too much, ate like shit and never exercised.  In May of 2010, I was logging 3-mile runs two or three times a week.  In May of 2011, I was recovering from my first marathon.

And in May of 2012, I unleashed an ultrarunning, trail-diggin’, dirt lovin’ dragon.

Here is my story:

Race Morning, 3:30 a.m.

I’m up!  Banana, granola bar, a big gooey blueberry muffin and a cup of coffee.  Did I sleep last night?  A little.  Am I nervous?  No!  But I should be… right?

In a couple of hours I will begin the journey of completing my very first 50 mile race.  With four road marathons and five trail 50Ks in my legs already, this is the trip that will really stretch my psyche.  This is the one that I’ve been daydreaming about for well over a year.

I’m craving it.  I’m expecting it.  I can’t wait to test the body I’ve been steadily building for this exact day, May 12, 2012.

Dad doesn’t seem to hear the blaring alarm clock deafening my ears so I nudge him awake and then we both busy ourselves with prepping for a very long day.  I’m really glad he’s here with me.  He’s one of the main reasons I fell in love with running in the first place and he’s been with me at every step of my transformation.  Despite the fact that he lives outside of Houston (which is pretty far from Chicago and the midwest) he was at my first 5K, my first half marathon, first marathon and first 50K!

Now he’s here for my first 50 miler, only instead of participating as runner or spectator, this time I’m puttin’ him to work as my crew.  Last night we went over his duties and I’m pretty confident that he’ll be a big help to me throughout the day.  This might be almost as epic for him as it will be for me.

I think that’s pretty cool.

Start Line, 5:30 a.m.

With so many of my New Leaf and M.U.D.D. friends also running in this race, I know the start and finish lines are gonna be buzzin’ with awesome-sauce.  Every time I look around I see someone I know, which is just fantastic!  With this kind of good company, it’s hard for me to give in to the normal anxieties and fears I usually have before a big race.  My stomach’s not churning at all.  I’m not shaking.  Instead, I’m crackin’ jokes and shakin’ hands.

If I were all alone right now, surely I’d be worrying about the unknown, about the fact that I’ve never run more than 32 miles at any one time, or longer than 6 and a half hours — both tasks I’m going to have to deal with. But I’m not alone.  I’m surrounded by a loving, joyous community.

And some kick-ass trail.

The temp is in the mid 50s.  It will get up into the high 60s, but we’ll have cloud cover for most of the day and virtually no rain (some spits here and there).

The race director addresses all 360+ of us, then comes the National Anthem.  I hug my dad goodbye and take my place at the start line.  This is really happening now.

This is really, actually happening.

Miles 1-9

The first section of the race takes place on the Nordic Loop, which is a relatively wide and flat grassy section, ideal for speed.  But this ain’t no speed contest.  This is a long haul.  And pacing will either save me, or destroy me.

My goal for today is to just finish the race, to enjoy the virginal voyage.  After the last few trail races, where I’ve placed in the top 10, it is paramount that I stay humble and don’t get cocky.  There are world class athletes here today with lots of experience and I need to just watch them blow by.

Racing a 50K is much different than racing a 50 miler.  I think.  Hell, I don’t even know how to race a 50 miler yet, because I’ve never done it!  And my track record on first races at all the different distances is not very good.

Sure, I’ve finished them all, but in each case (my first half marathon, first marathon, first 50K) I went out WAAAY too fast and had to suffer through some gut-busting, painful miles at the end.  I don’t want that to happen today.

So the plan is to run this first loop at a controlled 10-11 minute pace with my new friend, Geoff, whom I met at the Earth Day 50K.  He and I finished a close 4th and 5th there and since our paces are about the same, we decided to run this first bit together.

I’m very glad we did, because the conversation with Geoff is making this early portion quite fun.  As if the infinitely luscious green forest isn’t enough to make me smile, the chatter we have going makes it all the sweeter.  We share our running backgrounds and talk race schedules.  We wax on nutrition, training, and of course, beer (this will be an all-day theme actually).  We also share the strategy of running the flats, walking the uphills, and running the downs.  The Ice Age Trail is notorious for its incessant batch of rolling hills and having an attack plan could be key.

I’m carrying a 20 oz. handheld bottle and lots of GU stuffed in my short pockets.  All is going well so we blow by the first aid station.  In fact, the first 8 miles breeze by, but nature calls and I tell Geoff to head on while I make a quick stop to water the trees.

A few minutes later, I’m back on the trail, but the lot of racers has already spread out so much that I have little company.  That’s to be expected in a trail race, so I embrace the alone time while I have it.  As I come into the second aid station at mile 9, I see Dad waving his arms, yelling my name.

The temperature is rising, so I rip off my singlet, get a quick bottle refill and get back to work.

Miles 10-17

Cruising.  Damn.  I just feel… good.  I’m not going too fast.  Am I?  No.  I think.  I don’t know.

Because it is so early still, I try not to think about what I’m doing too much.  I mean, I don’t wanna stress myself out with math and splits and whatever else problem could come up. I’m pretty much just zooming along by myself here, enjoying the magnificent surroundings, eating a GU every half hour and taking a sip of my half-water-half-Gatorade mix every few minutes.  It’s not really too warm, but it is a bit humid and when the sun does break out of the clouds it jumps up and smacks me in the face.

Of course, the actual trail does a good job of smacking me in the face as well.  Literally.  While it’s not uncommon for me to trip and do a face-plant during the latter stages of a race, this early section sees me fall *BOOM* not once but *BOOM* twice.  Luckily, I’m alone and my embarrassment is limited to just me and Mother Nature, who graciously covers me with mud and dirt upon each trip.

After collecting myself, I reach one of the rare exposed sections of the course, close to a lake, and suddenly I’m choking on a swarm of bugs.

What the — … are these gnats or… midges or…. what the hell are these things?!?

Whatever they are, they swarm in bunches and attack from out of nowhere.  While some of them kamikaze into my sweaty torso, the majority decide to invade my eyes, ears and mouth.

AGGHH!  *Coughing*

I look behind me and see another runner falling victim to the same insect army.

Nasty, eh?

Disgusting, he says.  He has a very pleasant sounding British accent, and he’s running faster than I am, so I move out of the way and let him lead.

His name is Mark.  He’s from Evanston via Cambridge, England.  I recognize him from some earlier banter, back when I was running with Geoff.  We were talking about beer.

Though it’s quite early, we pick up our beer conversation in anticipation of the finish line refreshment and share some stories of races past.  Along the way, we pick up another runner, one donning a Marathon Maniacs singlet, whom I sheepishly anoint as “Maniac”.  Turns out his real name is Steve.

For the next 10-20 miles, I will spend a lot of time with Mark and Steve, ebbing and flowing according to the terrain.

That’s Mark there in front, leading me out of the forest, towards Highway 12.

Miles 17-30

Shortly after we depart the Highway 12 aid station at approximately 17.3 miles, I trip and fall AGAIN, this time breaking the strap on my water bottle.

Well, shit.

I don’t have a backup strap either.  Damn it!  But… wait… I do have… duct tape!  It’s in my gear bag that Dad is hauling around, and if anyone can create something functional out of duct tape, it’s my father.  He’s been doing it my whole life.

I will see him in 5 miles or so.  I can hold on to this thing the old fashioned way until then.  I hope.

BOOM.  I trip again.  What the FUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU!!!!

Pick up yer damn feet, Forest! I tell myself.  I can’t go a week of running in my neighborhood without some jackass yelling Run, Forest, Run! at me through his car window, so when I do something stupid I like to call myself Forest.  And today, Forest is falling all over his face.

BUT I’M STILL HAVING FUUUUUN! says Forest, er… I mean, me.

Here is where time sorta stops and I don’t know what’s happening where.  I know that my right IT band is aching.  And that has NEVER happened before.  On the uphill power hikes, when I have a chance, I stop and knead my knuckles into the band as hard as I can.  This relieves whatever pressure is building up, but my hand can’t keep up with the tightness and the lateral portion of my right knee begins to ache.  I know this is not good but I ain’t stoppin’ so I’ll just deal with it later.

Luckily, there are a lot of out-and-back sections in this race so there is a constant flow of traffic coming from the other direction.  At first it’s the leaders — whom I can’t help but stop and watch with complete awe.  Such form!  Such ease!  And then I’m on the other side, high-fiving those who are behind me.

Perhaps this is why everyone says the Ice Age Trail 50 is so special.  Hell, I know at least 50 people who are running this thing, and each time I see their smiling, suffering faces, I get a HUGE energy boost.  Pushing my limits is fun enough on its own I guess, but when it involves the type of camaraderie and support inherent in the ultrarunning community, it’s just like a big old party.  Instead of boozing, we’re running.  That’s all.

I try to use that energy in hammering the downhills, but eventually, all that force causes my right knee to ache, so I begin to take it easy on the downs.  This is probably a good thing, because now I’m starting to feel pretty tired.  Not wasted, just tired, as expected.  I look down at my watch to see 4 hours and 10 minutes have gone by and I’m only at 24.2 miles.

Can I sustain this pace for another marathon?  Will my knee hold up?  How many more times am I going to trip and fall?  Can I even feel my right toe anymore?

Before I can answer these questions I’m at another aid station, instructing Dad to rig me a duct tape bottle handle — a task he gleefully accepts.  I reload on GUs (even though I’m getting sick of them now), suck on some orange slices and I’m back on the trail.

Sticking with Mark and Steve, back and forth, all this time and finally I fall back.  I’m starting to feel more and more gassed.  The sun is busting out.  Mark takes off, Steve is right behind him, but I gotta slow down for a minute.

Zone out.  Just keep moving.  Don’t think too much.

I get to the shoulder of Duffin Road, 30.2 miles in the bag, and I see Dad.

VAS! I yell.

What? he says.

VAS!  I need VAS.

What!?!?

VASELINE, yells the crowd of other crew members, spectators and volunteers.  In unison.

I didn’t realize it until just now but I need some lubrication down in the nether regions and this aid station couldn’t have come at a better time.  In true trail runner form, I dip my hand in the jar, pull out of big glob and then immediately stick my hand down my shorts.  Apparently, I don’t mind an audience.

I’m starting to get hot, I tell Dad.  I don’t feel too good.  He douses me with ice water, dumps ice cubes in my bottle — a bottle that NOW has a nice, new and STRONG duct tape strap, (good work, Dad!) — and asks if I need anything else.

Salt.  I need salt.

He hurries to grab some salt tablets out of my bag and he kindly puts them in a plastic baggie for me to take.  My old man has always been there for me, and I know he always has my back, but in this instance, watching him run around all over this forest preserve, jumping into quick action at my slightest command, to help me, is quite a comforting feeling.  I know he’d like to be out there adventuring himself, and that crewing can be a drag sometimes, but more than anything, he is here for me.  I am not alone.

He believes in me.

You’re doing great, Jeff.  Keep going.  Just keep going, he says.

Miles 30-40

Still plodding away.

I catch up to Steve again.

Mark took off, he says.  Just flew.  Had a lot of energy left.

Not me, man.  I’m starting to feel tired, I admitted.

Me too.

Steve and I share the trail.  We talk about races we’ve run, races we want to run.  We keep each other going.

I see a bunch of folks coming on from the opposite direction again and the salutations, while maybe a bit quieter than they were during the first half, still serve as pleasant boosts of mental energy.  I say “mental”, because that’s what is taking over now.  My mind has to control everything from here on out because my body is starting to revolt.

Eventually Steve starts to fade, but I keep trucking.

BOOM.  I trip and fall.  Again.

Fuck you, earth.  Fuck you.  Then I look and see that the duct tape water bottle strap did not break.  Alas, duct tape is better than anything I could buy in a running store!  I’m sorry, earth.  I didn’t mean to say ‘fuck you’.  I love you.  Seriously. I really do.

I get back up.  Keep on moving.

Miles 40-48

I’m still surrounded by lush, green canopy, but I hear traffic.  And voices.  And…  a cowbell!

I come out of the forest and realize I am at Emma Carlin, aid station 10, and I’ve run 40.2 miles so far.  Holy shit.  40.2 miles.

Dad is waving his arms, yelling my name, and with all these people watching me run in I suddenly feel the urge to pick up the pace and at least LOOK strong, even if I don’t feel it.

40 miles already, Jeff!  Dang.  Just think how much you’ve done. You’ve never gone that far before, says Dad.

I think I wanna be done now.

Nooo, you’re doing good.  Just keep going.

Just keep going.  Just keep moving.  Just put one foot in front of the other.

What time is it? I ask.

One thirty, someone says.

I want it to be beer thirty, I say.  Everyone within ear shot chuckles.  I smile too.  Dad tries to hand me GUs but I’ll puke if I eat another so I go for the orange slices instead.  Also, some Coke, some water, some whatever… I don’t know, I’m tired and I’m pretty sure I smell worse than I ever have before and I’m globbing Vaseline all over my balls and I had some bugs for lunch and… wha… huh…

This is the last time I’ll see Dad before I make it to the finish line, so I give him a big hug and thank him for his help.

I honestly feel like shit right now.  Just completely zapped of energy.  I went too fast in the middle sections and now my unseasoned body is paying for it.  But there’s a huge crowd here at Emma Carlin and I won’t be out of their sight as I run away for a good quarter mile so I’m gonna bust it outta here and will myself to finish strong.

Zoom.

Off I go… 10 minute pace, 9 minute pace, 8 minute pace!  I look at my watch and see I can finish under 9 hours if I just stay strong and steady.

But where will the energy come from? I ask myself.  Don’t worry, I answer myself.  Just keep moving.

And then, SNAP, THWACK, BOOM.

I’m on the ground.  Again.  Face down.

I hear the Inception soundtrack as I look at the deceivingly beautiful rocks and roots responsible for slamming me to the ground.  I roll over, slowly, and gaze up at the light peaking through the gargantuan canopy.  I’m tired.  I’m so, so tired.

SO WHAT. GET UP.

I’m achy.  So, so achy.

SO WHAT. GET. UP.

I want to be in bed, under the covers, with the lights off.

GET.

UP.

NOW.

I get up.  I put one foot in front of the other.  I tell myself I can walk all the hills, but I have to run — or at least try to run — the remaining flats and downs.

I reach an oasis at Horseriders, the 43.3 mile mark and I see some friendly faces (Brian, Kelly, Geoff and Paige).  Their encouragement gives me an extra boost.  But I got 6.7 miles to go and I think I wanna die so I’m not sure how much the boost will last.

As quickly as I was surrounded by a swarm of people, I’m just as quickly all by myself.  I come to a series of big hills — DO THESE HILLS EVER FRIGGIN’ STOP??? — and before I can power hike (can we even call it that at this point? more like anti-power crawl) up the dang thing I actually have to come to a complete stop, take a few deep breaths, then psyche myself into moving further along.

People start to pass me.  I’m wavin’ ’em through.  They’re saying “good work” and “dig deep” and “stay strong” but they’re all full of shit.  I look terrible.  I feel terrible.  I’m slow and I’m basically crippled.  I can’t feel my right big toe.  My IT band and knee still ache but I can hardly tell because I’ve fallen so many times that all the scrapes and bruises are beginning to take precedent.

BUT I SIGNED UP FOR THIS.

A guy passes me, moving pretty swiftly.  As he darts by I throw out an invisible lasso, hook him around the waist and let him pull me.  My feet are moving along quite nicely (considering) for a good bit so the invisible lasso works.  Eventually another dude flies by.  I lasso him too and let him carry me for a few hundred yards until the invisible rope breaks, just as I break myself.

I hear Jimmy Buffett off in the distance.  I lasso that motherfucker and let him bring me in.  Maybe he has margaritas.

If he does, I don’t see them.  I don’t ask either, for fear they might actually have them.  The thought of putting anything in my mouth (liquid or otherwise) absolutely disgusts me at this point.  I feel kind of sick.  Dizzy.  Am I gonna throw up?  I try, but I can’t.

My only option is to just go finish this thing.  At least I’m only 1.5 miles from the finish, right?   Nope.  Someone tells me I’m still 2.5 miles from the finish.  Oh well.  I don’t know what to believe anymore.  All I believe is I’m broken.

I leave the aid station and find myself alone again.  I’m shuffling now.

And then, I start to cry.  Like a big baby.

WHY!?!

I have no idea why.  Maybe it’s because it has taken me about an hour to go these last 4 miles.  Maybe it’s because my body aches and wants to sit in a pool.  Maybe it’s because I’m just not as tough as I think I am.

NO, YOU DUMMY. IT’S BECAUSE YOU’RE PUSHING YOURSELF. YOU’RE BREAKING THROUGH. YOU’RE REALLY DOING THIS.

Really?  I’m really doing this?

I’m really doing this!

I wipe the tears away, dust myself off and put one foot in front of the other as fast as I can.

– – –

Miles 48-50

Jeff!!! someone shouts from behind.

*CUE THE HALLELUJAH ANGEL CHOIR, BITCHES, CUZ I’M ABOUT TO GET ALL VERKLEMPT*

Behind me is my buddy, Siamak.  He’s in my running club and we’ve spent most Wednesday nights since January running together.  He looks strong.  He looks fresh.  And most importantly, he’s wearing a big old smile on his face.

Siamak, man… oh, god, I… I’m not doin’ so good… I…

Come on, bro, run it in with me.  You got this.  Let’s go in together.

I pick up the pace to match his, which is much faster than what I was going.  I search my brain for something to say.  I’m searching hard, but I have that Microsoft hourglass of death spinning relentlessly and I don’t know what to say.  I felt so small just now, like a burned up piece of space junk ready to disintegrate into the atmosphere, and then Siamak came along and now… now everything is okay and I’m gonna finish this race and my dad’s gonna be there and all my friends and I’ve worked so hard and…

I’m crying again.

I’m sorry, man… I don’ know why… I don’t know why I’m so emotional right now.

Hey, it happens.  To a lot of people. 

I look at him and he’s all there.  Has his wits.  His legs.  Dude, if you want to go ahead of me, don’t let me hold you back —

Nah, let’s do this together.

Time.  There is no time.  This moment, right now, even with these last few hills to climb and these last few meters to run, this moment, it will always live.  It will always be.

Here on Saturday, May 12, 2012, I woke up with the goal of running 50 miles — FIFTY FRIGGIN’ MILES — and I sure as hell am about to reach that goal.

I made some mistakes.  Yes.  I fell flat on my face.  I also marveled at nature’s endless beauty while getting to play in the most gorgeous of forests for hours on end.  I had a ton of  laughs, a bunch of real conversations with real, fascinating, INTERESTING people.  And I had an endless amount of support, from my family, from my friends.

But right now, it’s just Siamak and I.  And the finish line.

Smile, he says, you’ll feel better.

I do.  He is right.

We end our journeys together.  9 hours, 38 minutes.  I collapse into my Dad’s arms.  I don’t know if I’ve ever felt happier.

Post Race

Man, we had a blast.  I had at least six beers, got to catch up with Steve and Mark.  I talked to everyone who would talk to me.  I cheered on all my other buddies coming through the finish line in style.  It was such a fantastic day — a day that I will never forget, ever.

And, despite all the pain and suffering I experienced in the last 10 miles, my body is recovering nicely.  I promised myself I would take a week off.  But, once an ultrarunner, always an ultrarunner.

The next target race?  The Howl at the Moon 8 Hour Ultra in August.  It’s gonna be hot, humid and downright nasty as I try to run as many miles as I can in an 8-hour period on a 3.2 mile loop course.

The more I run, the harder I push and the further I go, I learn just what kind of man I really am.  And I’ll tell ya what: I’m a damn happy one.


Stop Time: Gallivant through Luscious Forest

All this rugged trail running is making me tough and leathery.  I feel stronger.  Gettin’ dirty.  But being so often bombarded by nature’s beauty is also leaving me emotionally vulnerable.  It’s hard for me to not stop, to soak in my surroundings, to dissociate from time and to just be in the moment.

I think that’s a perfect mix of cojones and heart.

My running club organized a 50K (31 mile) fun run through Wisconsin’s southern unit of the Kettle Moraine forest yesterday.  With the Ice Age Trail 50 Miler just 7 weeks away, I knew logging some long hours on the actual route I’ll be running during the race would be nothing but beneficial, so I took the whole day to really immerse myself in the trail.

Holy bejeebus.  It’s as beautiful as it is tough.

The elevation gain from my forest adventure only totaled about 2,400 feet, but the constant up and down rolling nature of the moraines (a result of the last ice age glacier melts, thus the name) is so relentless that I never could find a consistent rhythm to my stride.  Walk up hill a little, fly down hill a little, walk up hill a little, fly down, and so on.  WHERE ARE THE FLATS?

I never found them, but I did find out that Wisconsin is home to one of the most luscious forests I’ve ever seen.  It was like running on Endor!  I kept anticipating an Ewok ambush or stumbling across one of the Empire’s hidden bases.  Green, green, green!

And the sounds: loons, bullfrogs, crickets, swallows, robins, my tired footfalls.

There were several moments along the trail when I thought, Man this is hard!  How am I ever going to run 50 miles on it if I’m struggling through 31?  I had moments where I felt awful, but I also had moments where I felt euphoric, and the switch was made within minutes.

At one point I looked down to notice I’d “run” a 15 minute mile.  That’s some real humbling shit right there, especially to a guy who touts himself as a regional class speedster.  15 minute mile!?!  Good grief. 

But I later realized, if having to suck up some slow miles is what it takes to become part of nature’s truest gifts, then I’m all for it.  In the end, it took me 6 hours and 21 minutes to complete my 31 mile Kettle adventure.  That’s the longest run I’ve ever logged to date.  To put that time in perspective, my current 50K trail PR is 5:15, and I barely gave any effort in attaining that time, as it too was just a fun run.

Yet I can’t help but think 6 hours and 21 minutes still isn’t enough time to sufficiently gallivant through such luscious forest.  It surely didn’t feel like I was out there that long.  And despite the aches in my glutes and the pains in my quads, I didn’t want to escape the canopy.  I wanted to stay in there as long as I could.

Time stops in there.  And in a world where time is often my enemy, suddenly I don’t mind reevaluating my expectations.